Fourth Malaysian church attacked in ‘Allah’ feud

KUALA LUMPUR, AP – A fourth church in Malaysia has been firebombed, stoking concern among Christians as a dispute rages over the use of the word “Allah” by non-Muslims.

 

Saturday’s attack was the latest in a series of assaults, just days after a Kuala Lumpur court ruled non-Muslims could use Allah to refer to God in their literature.

KUALA LUMPUR, AP – A fourth church in Malaysia has been firebombed, stoking concern among Christians as a dispute rages over the use of the word “Allah” by non-Muslims.

 

Saturday’s attack was the latest in a series of assaults, just days after a Kuala Lumpur court ruled non-Muslims could use Allah to refer to God in their literature.

 

Bishop Philip Loke said two firebombs were thrown at his Good Shepherd Lutheran Church early Saturday but missed the glass windows, hitting the building wall instead.

He said church members discovered two burned patches on the wall at midday and found glass splinters on the ground. There was no damage to the three-story building in the Petaling Jaya suburb in central Selangor state.

 

Three churches were struck Friday.

 

Why resort to violence? These attacks are a cowardly act and a crime against the Christian population,” Loke told The Associated Press.

 

Many Muslims are angry about a Dec. 31 High Court decision overturning a government ban on Roman Catholics’ using Allah for God in the Malay-language edition of their main newspaper, the Herald.

 

The ruling also applies to the ban’s broader applications, such as Malay-language Bibles.

 

Selangor police chief Khalid Abu Bakar said the attacks indicated the work of amateurs.

 

We don’t think the attacks were planned or coordinated. We believe they were carried out by hooligans or mischievous pranksters trying to take advantage to stir the situation,” he said.

 

Investigations were ongoing but there were no witnesses so far, he said.

The government contends that making Allah synonymous with God may confuse Muslims and ultimately mislead to them into converting to Christianity, a punishable offense in Malaysia despite a constitution that guarantees freedom of religion.

About 9 percent of Malaysia’s 28 million people are Christian, including 800,000 Catholics, most of whom are ethnic Chinese or Indian. Muslims make 60 percent of the population and most are Malays.

 

At least one church canceled its Friday Mass while others beefed up security.

The Allah ban is unusual in the Muslim world. The Arabic word is commonly used by Christians to describe God in such countries as Egypt and Syria.

 

Edited from the AP

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