James Cameron won the best-director Golden Globe on Jan 17 for his science-fiction blockbuster “Avatar,” which is following in the footsteps of his “Titanic” as a box-office record-breaker and awards darling.

 

“Avatar” also was up for best drama, along with the Harlem tale “Precious,” the recession tale `”Up in the Air” and the war stories “The Hurt Locker” and “Inglourious Basterds.”

 

Among acting winners were Meryl Streep as chef Julia Child in “Julie & Julia,” Mo’Nique as a loathsome, abusive welfare mother in “Precious” and Christoph Waltz as a gleefully bloodthirsty Nazi in “Inglourious Basterds.”

(Edited from AP) James Cameron won the best-director Golden Globe on Jan 17 for his science-fiction blockbuster “Avatar,” which is following in the footsteps of his “Titanic” as a box-office record-breaker and awards darling.

 

“Avatar” also was up for best drama, along with the Harlem tale “Precious,” the recession tale `”Up in the Air” and the war stories “The Hurt Locker” and “Inglourious Basterds.”

 

Among acting winners were Meryl Streep as chef Julia Child in “Julie & Julia,” Mo’Nique as a loathsome, abusive welfare mother in “Precious” and Christoph Waltz as a gleefully bloodthirsty Nazi in “Inglourious Basterds.”

 

The blockbuster “Up” came away with the award for animated film.

 

While Streep is a perennial at awards shows, the prize marked a dramatic turning point for Mo’Nique, who was mainly known for lowbrow comedy but startled audiences with her ferocious performance in “Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ By Sapphire.” Mo’Nique plays a loathsome, abusive welfare mother.

 

Streep’s competition for best actress in a musical or comedy included herself. She also was nominated for the romance “It’s Complicated.”

 

“I just want to say that in my long career, I’ve played so many extraordinary woman that I’m getting mistaken for one,” Streep said. “I’m very clear that I’m the vessel for other people’s stories and other people’s lives.”

 

Waltz, a veteran Austrian actor who is a relative newcomer in Hollywood, won the supporting-actor Globe as a gleefully bloodthirsty Nazi in Quentin Tarantino’s “Inglourious Basterds.”

 

The nominees offered a mix of far-out fantasy (“Avatar”) and ripped-from-the-headlines reality (the Iraq drama “The Hurt Locker,” the recession tale “Up in the Air”) at the Globes, Hollywood’s first major film honors that will help sort out the Oscar picture.

 

Though one of Hollywood’s biggest parties, the Globes bore somber reminders of tragedy in the real world, many stars wearing ribbons in support of earthquake victims in Haiti.

 

Jason Reitman and Sheldon Turner won the screenplay honor for “Up in the Air,” which Reitman also directed. The foreign-language honor went to “The White Ribbon,” a stark drama of guilt and suspicion set in a German town on the eve of World War I.

 

James Cameron’s sci-fi epic “Avatar” came in with four nominations but lost its first two categories, for song and musical score. Cameron’s tale – which has soared up the box-office charts with $1.6 billion worldwide, second only to his own “Titanic” at $1.8 billion – had to wait until the end of the show for its next categories, best director and drama.

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