(http://tatsunoko.vscapcom.com/)  Rated Teen by ESRB.  Following titles such as Marvel vs. Capcom and Capcom vs. SNK, Capcom has recently released Tatsunoko vs. Capcom Ultimate All-Stars for the Wii. In this installment of Capcom’s “vs.” fighting series, they bring in the anime production firm Tatsunoko. The play style is still the tried-and-true 2D fighting, except there are plenty of surprises here. For one, the fighting is a lot more relaxing than the Capcom fighting games are traditionally known for.

(http://tatsunoko.vscapcom.com/)  Rated Teen by ESRB.  Following titles such as Marvel vs. Capcom and Capcom vs. SNK, Capcom has recently released Tatsunoko vs. Capcom Ultimate All-Stars for the Wii. In this installment of Capcom’s “vs.” fighting series, they bring in the anime production firm Tatsunoko. The play style is still the tried-and-true 2D fighting, except there are plenty of surprises here. For one, the fighting is a lot more relaxing than the Capcom fighting games are traditionally known for.  

Presentation:

It appears as though presentation is what this game is all about. While Easter Eggs in most video games requires a little bit of looking around, they are littered all over here. Tatsunoko vs. Capcom brings together characters from the 2 companies. Tatsunoko Production had produced many beloved animation series since the 1960s, especially in Japan. Some of their works, such as Science Ninja Team Gatchaman and Tekkaman: the Space Knight, had even been shown in the States. Capcom’s roster does not disappoint either, bringing in characters ranging from Ryu of the original Street Fighter to PTX-40A from Lost Planet. The anime vs video game fights take place over the game’s dynamic stages that change during the fight.

 

Graphics:

Tatsunoko vs. Capcom uses an interesting blend of cel-shaded character models and 3D stage background, creating a refreshing pseudo-3D effect. This particular technique also makes the characters stand out against the vibrant background, where other recent action/fighting games have problems with characters being camouflaged into the environment. Although the characters are colorful and distinct in their own right, some of them survived the transition to cel-shaded from their former 2D selves better than the others. That aside, having Viewtiful Joe blown up to a big TV screen based on his DS appearance would be fitting to the game’s over-the-top hyper attacks.

         

Sounds:

The most notable audible effects are the Japanese voice acting. Some might say the absence of localization in that aspect is a lack of effort, but then it wouldn’t sound right if Ryu had started saying “plasma fist” or “shockwave fist” instead of the original “HADOKEN!!” The soundtrack is similarly true to their originals, but the abundance of anime-music perhaps is a bit too memorable.

Gameplay:

Tatsunoko vs. Capcom uses a partnering system similar to that in Marvel vs. Capcom. Having 2 characters per fight has more implication than just tag team play since tactical switches between the 2 partners can often turn the tide of the battle. And although using the flashy hyper attacks with one single character is already satisfying, taking advantage of each partner’s special abilities with the “crossover attacks” offers far more depth and is encouraged. The game’s method of damage calculation is also strongly encouraging, as all the attacks are measured in terms of billions. A successful combo will cause billions and billions of damage, enough to annihilate whole games worth of characters. The actual fighting however favors characters with ranged attacks or has low recovery time, spamming single attacks aggressively is the key to victory.

         

Innovation:

All things considered, this game is welcoming for veterans and newcomers alike. The game allows the players to use wiimote, wiimote with nunchuck, classic controller, gamecube controller, or the sturdy Mad Catz Arcade Fightstick. Some of them handle more similar to another, but some differ greatly in terms of control scheme as well as the methods of triggering special moves. For example, the wiimote with nunchuck allows the player to pull off special moves with the press of an attack button alongside a direction, reminiscent of Super Smash Bros’ style of controls. That in particular makes anyone instantly feel like a veteran, ready to indulge in the more tactical aspects of the fighting. On the other hand, some other controllers, including the Mad Catz Arcade Stick, allow veteran players to execute moves using the classic inputs for greater precision over which moves are used.

 

Longevity:

As far as fighting games go, there is not a whole lot of variety besides going head to head against another player or the AI. There is also the option of finding online players through its match up, but of course the experience varies depending on the internet connection as well as Nintendo Wi-Fi’s sometimes intermittent capability. For playing solo, it requires several extra runs through its Arcade Mode to unlock the five hidden characters. Every play through will also earn the player some in-game money, which is used for purchasing the plethora of concept arts and alternate colors for the characters. The gallery contains many concept arts of both Capcom and Tatsunoko origins, fans of their works is bound to appreciate the gesture.

       

 

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