(Edited from AP) The biggest issue in designing for one-room living is separating public and private space, says Kenneth Brown, a Los Angeles interior designer who appears on “reDesign,” on the Fine Living Network and HGTV. Nobody at a dinner party wants to be staring at a bed,” Brown says. For a one-room project featured on his show, Brown used a bookcase as a room divider to separate the public and private areas of the room, as well as to store books and provide a stand for a swivel TV. (Edited from AP) The biggest issue in designing for one-room living is separating public and private space, says Kenneth Brown, a Los Angeles interior designer who appears on “reDesign,” on the Fine Living Network and HGTV. Nobody at a dinner party wants to be staring at a bed,” Brown says. For a one-room project featured on his show, Brown used a bookcase as a room divider to separate the public and private areas of the room, as well as to store books and provide a stand for a swivel TV. While each room differs according to how his clients want to live (how much space they want devoted to entertaining, to a home office, etc.), Brown says there are rules that always apply: – Don’t be afraid of big pieces. Lots of small ones will clutter a space. – Select furniture on legs so you can see under the piece. – Don’t float the furniture in the center of the room. – Try lining the walls with two large sofas. -Select a coffee table that may double for dining. – Commit to one color and bring in different textures. That way the walls recede and the eye is not stopped by an accent wall. – Create zones in your room with lighting. For example, hang a chandelier over the entertaining area. 

Brown believes that concealing stuff in pretty boxes is key to living artfully in one room. You might want to try out some rules above to see if you can have a “brand new” room.

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