Seattle, WA – Have you ever thought about buying a digital camera, but then was overwhelmed by the astounding number of choices you have? Below we have outlined a few things for you to keep in mind the next time you go camera shopping which will help you find the right camera for your purposes.

Seattle, WA – Have you ever thought about buying a digital camera, but then was overwhelmed by the astounding number of choices you have? Below we have outlined a few things for you to keep in mind the next time you go camera shopping which will help you find the right camera for your purposes.

 

Point-and-shoot:

These are the small cameras that everyone and their grandma seem to carry around. They come conveniently-sized, many are smaller than your wallet, and can take great on-the-go snapshot photos. These babies are usually packed with dummy modes for different scenes like sunsets or night shooting, and a lot of other options which most people either don’t care about or would never use. This camera is self-sufficient for those who want to take photographs of everything, documenting birthdays, graduations, a weekend picnic, or just about anything else you can think of. While not impossible, be aware that taking night photographs tend to be more difficult with this type of camera. Also note that point-and-shoots do not take the photo when you press down on the shutter; there is always a delay, which will interfere when photographing moving subjects, such as people.

 

Advanced point-and-shoot:

This is the bigger brother of the point-and-shoot. The cool thing about these is that they usually sport a gigantic zoom range, which allows you to peer into the distance. This is good for stadium shooting, where you get nosebleed seats and a regular point-and-shoot won’t allow you to zoom in far enough on the action. These cameras are relatively expensive, in the range of starter-level dSLR’s. They usually pack a lot more features and options than point-and-shoots, for those advanced photographers who wish to further control every single aspect of how a photograph is taken.

 

Digital single lens reflex (dSLR):

Hailing from its ancestors of 35mm film, dSLR’s are the digital versions of SLR’s. There is quite a range of cameras in this class, from starting dSLR’s which provide very simple and easy instructions for every option, to professional cameras which require the user to have prior experience to understand even how to take a picture with it. There are only four advantages a dSLR has over point-and-shoots: 1)better adaptability to shooting at night; 2) it shoots faster, so it suits fast-paced action.

 

FINAL VERDICT: Stick with point-and-shoots, unless you want to shoot a lot of photos at night, or regularly shoot fast-paced action. If you are serious about venturing into the creative photography world, then stick with an entry-level dSLR and the kit lens that usually comes with it.

-Two Photography

www.twophotography.com

 

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