Mayor McGinn and Deputy Mayor Smith visited International District on March 18th. The tour stopped at Wing Luke Asian Museum, Hing Hay Park, and Chinatown Gate. The Mayor had hoped to personally affirm the issues brought to his attention, and to hear from the local communities.

Mayor McGinn and Deputy Mayor Smith visited International District on March 18th. The tour stopped at Wing Luke Asian Museum, Hing Hay Park, and Chinatown Gate. The Mayor had hoped to personally affirm the issues brought to his attention, and to hear from the local communities.

 

The small audience included many members of the Neighborhood Block Watch, who wore blue vests bearing Chinese characters that read “assist and watch over each others”. Mayor McGinn pleased the community by wearing the vest briefly, symbolizing his walk around the district as a sign of watching out for the community.

 

Some issues were discussed before the walk, including: aggressive panhandlers, police patrol, parking, and public safety. In response, a speaker of the police department mentioned the footbeat initiative, which will reassign a few members of the bikesquad to foot patrol. These officers will be able to provide more personal services and concentrated attention.

          

The footbeat initiative had shown strong effects in other areas. It will start in April in the west precinct for the Chinatown International District. Its availability has yet to be determined.

 

When the Mayor asked the owners of Phnom Penh Noodle Soup House (B18 on Chinatown Map) about concerns, they commented on their carry-out business being hurt by aggressive parking ticket enforcement. The Mayor made note of the issue and asked one of his staff to look into it.

       

When asked, “Despite the Asian culture don’t traditionally encourage interaction with the government, the communities had organized many programs to improve the neighborhood. How is the Mayoral Office helping to improve the communication?” Mayor McGinn responded by mentioning the Department of Neighborhoods, who reaches out and coordinate with the communities. And they also “make inventory of the communities”, staying in contact with the leaders of the various communities and organizations.

 

For more information on neighborhood planning, visit www.seattle.gov/neighborhoods

 

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