April 16th  was the final day for households to mail back their 2010 Census forms, if people want to reduce their chances of having a census taker knock at their door. The Census Bureau will begin planning the expensive personal door-to-door visits to non-responding households that begin as early as April 29.

April 16th  was the final day for households to mail back their 2010 Census forms, if people want to reduce their chances of having a census taker knock at their door. The Census Bureau will begin planning the expensive personal door-to-door visits to non-responding households that begin as early as April 29.

The Census Bureau saves about $85 million in operational costs for every one percent of households that mail back their forms. If every household completed and mailed back their census form, taxpayers could reduce the cost of taking the census and save $1.5 billion. In 2000, the nation reversed a three-decade decline in mail response rates and saved $305 million.

For the first time, the Census Bureau has mailed replacement forms to areas with historically lower mail response rates. Research shows that the replacement forms will help increase mail response in those areas, which significantly reduces the cost of taking the census.

All census responses are confidential. Answers are protected by law and cannot be shared with anyone. Extreme measures are taken to protect the identity of individuals and businesses. By law, the Census Bureau cannot share respondents’ individually identifiable answers with anyone, including tribal housing authorities, other federal agencies and law enforcement entities.

You can call the Telephone Questionnaire Assistance Center hotlines for assistance seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. local time. The phone numbers are: English: 1-866-872-6868, Spanish: 1-866-928-2010, Chinese: 1-866-935-2010, Korean: 1-866-955-2010, Russian: 1-866-965-2010, Vietnamese: 1-866-945-2010, TDD (hearing impaired): 1-866-783-2010.

Also, you can see below for the answers for some frequented asked questions:

2010 Census Frequently Asked Questions

Why is the census important?
Data collected from the census affects political representation in the U.S. House of Representatives. The collected information also helps to determine how more than $400 billion of federal funding each year is spent on infrastructure and services such as hospitals, job training centers, schools, bridges, tunnels and other-public works projects, and emergency services.

Is there a deadline to turn in my census form?
The Census Bureau will be collecting census data through July 30, 2010.  However, everyone is encouraged to mail back their forms this week.  Anyone who does not mail in their forms this week should expect a personal visit from a census taker, who will verbally collect the information for the ten questions.

What do I do if I did not receive a census form?
If you did not receive a form, you can call the Telephone Questionnaire Assistance center at 1-866-872-6868.  In-language assistance centers are also available in Chinese (1-866-935-2010), Korean (1-866-955-2010) and Vietnamese (1-866-945-2010). The lines are open from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., seven days a week, until July 30, 2010.

How can I receive a census questionnaire form in a different language?
The forms are available in six languages, including Chinese (simplified), Korean and Vietnamese.  You will be able to request a form in one of these languages by calling the toll-free numbers listed. In addition, there are Language Assistance Guides available in 59 different languages to help people fill out the English version of the census form.

What if I do not turn in my census form?
The Census Bureau encourages everyone to mail in their questionnaires this week. If people do not mail back their forms by this week, they can expect a personal visit from a census taker after April 16. The census taker will ask you the questions on the form, record your answers and then submit the form for your household.

What if I make a mistake on my census form?
If you checked the wrong box, just draw a line through it and mark the correct box for the question. If the error is in a write-in box, carefully draw a line through the incorrect entry and write the correct information as close as possible to the entry.

How do I know my information will be kept confidential?
The Census Bureau cannot share respondents’ answers with anyone, including other government agencies, such as the IRS, FBI or CIA. All Census Bureau employees take an oath and are sworn for life to protect the confidentiality of the data. Any employee who releases any information about the data can face a fine up to $250,000 and up to five years in jail.

I turned in my census questionnaire on time.  Why is there a census taker still knocking at my door?
The Census Bureau uses quality checks to ensure that procedures are working and that the staff is doing the job they were assigned to do. Additionally, if your form is turned in late, your response might not be logged before a census taker is sent out.

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