(Edited from AP, Libya) A Libyan plane carrying 104 people crashed Wednesday on approach to Tripoli’s airport, leaving a field scattered with smoldering debris that included a large chunk of the tail painted with the airline’s brightly colored logo. A 10-year-old Dutch boy was the only known survivor.

(Edited from AP, Libya) A Libyan plane carrying 104 people crashed Wednesday on approach to Tripoli’s airport, leaving a field scattered with smoldering debris that included a large chunk of the tail painted with the airline’s brightly colored logo. A 10-year-old Dutch boy was the only known survivor.

The Dutch prime minister said everyone on the Afriqiyah Airways Airbus A330-200 arriving from Johannesburg, South Africa, was killed except the child, whose survival was hailed as a miracle.

The boy was taken to a hospital in Tripoli and was undergoing surgery for injuries including broken bones. Libyan TV showed video of the dark-haired child lying in a hospital bed with a bandaged head and wearing an oxygen mask. He had intravenous lines in one arm and appeared to be conscious.

The Royal Dutch Tourism Board said 61 of the dead came from the Netherlands, including many holidaymakers who had been on package tours to South Africa.

Dutch flags were lowered and campaigning for the June 9 parliamentary elections was suspended in respect for the dead. Hundreds of people phoned emergency numbers to ask about family and friends while authorities at other destination airports set up crisis centers.

Besides the Dutch, the other victims were French, German, South African, Finnish, British and Libyan, according to the transportation minister.

The plane was approaching the airport in the Libyan capital Tripoli when it crashed at around 6 a.m. (0400 GMT, 11 p.m. EDT Tuesday). There was no immediate word on the cause, according to a statement by the airline posted on its website.

The company that runs the Johannesburg airport said the flight departed at 9:37 p.m. local time (3:37 p.m. EDT) Tuesday.

The aircraft that crashed was delivered from the production line in September 2009. It had accumulated approximately 1,600 flight hours in some 420 flights, according to Airbus.

Wednesday’s crash was the fourth deadly landing accident at Tripoli airport in the past 40 years, according to the website of the U.S.-based Flight Safety Foundation.

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