(http://us.playstation.com/games-and-media/games/mlb-10-the-show-ps3.html) Rated E for Everyone by ESRB. MLB 10 has it all! The Show has officially raised the bar for any sports game for this year. The game’s foundations have been improved and new elements really create a solid gaming experience. The 2K series might have improved this year, but somehow The Show still takes the lead. MLB 10 The Show is quite far ahead in graphics, gameplay, presentation and franchise depth, it’s not only the best baseball simulation on the market but it might also be the best sports simulation to date. The developer did not introduce anything substantially new to this year’s installment, so it feels like an enhanced remade of the 2009 version and a fully fine-tuned release.

 

(http://us.playstation.com/games-and-media/games/mlb-10-the-show-ps3.html)  Rated E for Everyone by ESRB. MLB 10 has it all! The Show has officially raised the bar for any sports game for this year. The game’s foundations have been improved and new elements really create a solid gaming experience. The 2K series might have improved this year, but somehow The Show still takes the lead. MLB 10 The Show is quite far ahead in graphics, gameplay, presentation and franchise depth, it’s not only the best baseball simulation on the market but it might also be the best sports simulation to date. The developer did not introduce anything substantially new to this year’s installment, so it feels like an enhanced remade of the 2009 version and a fully fine-tuned release.

Presentation:

The Show is once again in the league of its own in terms of capturing the look of professional baseball. It is a comprehensively detailed game that gives you a real game experience. The dugouts, for example, are now fully manned in real time, and you’ll see them interacting in between plays in ways that are not just standard cutscenes. Everything is crisp, colorful, and fluid. Stadiums are with exceptional details. Athletes move with stunning realism and games are filled with small details such as fans recklessly lunging over walls for foul balls, batters having words with empires after called strikes, or hitters trying to steer a potential homeruns fair. There are also a ton of nice little touches, like a catcher tossing aside his mask to field a pop fly or an infielder looking restless between pitches. The in-game sound effects is just as good with the home crowd roaring as soon as the ball is struck, energizing organ music, and player specific chants. There are also awesome new camera angles let you to see more of the actions. MLB 10’s overall action is probably a bit more realistic, speaking from a baseball sim standpoint, while 2K10’s packaging felt more like a broadcast.

Graphics:

Visually, this is a real stunner. Nice animations, good-looking crowds, and excellent facial renders make The Show a good baseball game. Everything is crafted so well. Everything is very detailed and realistic even though most of the visual cues are very small and easy to miss, Sony got them all right. Stadiums are perfectly recreated, accurately depicting the minute elements. These finer details make the game look so photo-realistic that even if you swap that onto a bar’s TV screen, people might even not notice it is animated. It has a much upgraded shading and lighting that really bring out some exceptional details in the players.

Player art is also superb. You can spot the facial expressions change depending on what’s taking place on the field. The lifelike crowd is also a much-needed bonus in today sports game. When adding all these elements together, it gives you the ultimate real life gaming experience that you have been longed for. Though it’s hard to say how much Sony did enhance on the game graphics, it still looks better than the 2K10 by quite a margin.

Sounds:

Sound is almost as important as visual and for the most part, MLB 10 delivers. Even though the announcers drag things down quite a bit, good crowd sounds and lots of customization options from walk-up music to fan cheers make it up. Stadium sounds are convincing. Crowd noise is active and seems accurate, especially during rivalry games at key moments. The in-park sound effects are true to the sport, from the ballpark announcements and, of course, organ music to the crack of the bat. But commentary is beginning to show it age, lacking the detail and variety found in MLB 2K10. The commentary team tends to be a little bit dry and often oblivious to the action on the field. However, Dave Campbell does a solid color commentary especially with the solid play-by-play commenting. The background music isn’t bad either, with a few carefully chosen alternative rock songs. And if you are bored by the no-so-good commentary, you can also use the audio editor to create custom stadium and entrance music for your very own and unique gaming experience.

Gameplay:

Of course, all the little details and the good ambient audio mean nothing if the game itself plays poorly. Fortunately, MLB 10: The Show continues the series’ tradition of stellar gameplay. The on-field mechanics are rock solid. The game controls are well done and a new camera system also picks up the visual elements. The good news is, that The Show plays a good realistic game of baseball. You will notice a nice variety of hit types, and on a higher difficulty setting, that the computer AI will work that into account and play that to the strength of its team. The bad news is, that if you weren’t impressed with The Show’s pitching/fielding and hitting mechanics, nothing has really changed. The pitching control offers a choice of a hypersensitive arch shape meter that determines the accuracy and velocity or a traditional system of selecting a pitch type and its location, and watch the player executes to the best of his ability. The later option is more realistic since it relies on the pitcher’s real life attributes rather than your reflexes but it is less involving. Hitting once again simply involves timing your swing when the ball crosses the plate. It is still just a button tap so there is no analog swing for those who appreciate the 2K system. The Total Pitching feature at 2K10 seems to be more engaging, challenging, and interesting; in which you have to use the R analog to do the trick correctly in order to throw the ball that you want. It is innovative, but might be difficult to pick up for the newbies. Other noteworthy new features of The Show include the throwing system that takes into account the individual arm strength and the new pickoff option from the mount. You can also better tailor your defensive alignment to exploit each opposing hitter tendencies. But that’s basically it for gameplay otherwise it’s identical to MLB 09.

There are three main game modes in MLB 10 to compliment some nice bonus offerings like the new Home Run Derby and the returning Rivalry and Manager modes. Franchise mode offers control of all 30 teams if you want to have a full season experience, which is awesome. It includes injury management tools and the option to use just about every Major League rule that an owner and GM must deal with, adding much more depth to the game mode.

The Road to the Show mode is where you can create a custom-made athlete and follow his career from the Minors to the Majors and now has an option to call the game from behind the plate if you selected catcher. It is a little more than a gimmick. All it is doing is transferring the decision you make on the mount to behind the plate. Though you can’t help your pitcher by framing your glove closer to the strike zone on outside balls. Instead, you select the pitch, choose a location, and just watch the throw. You can also set training points by setting interesting goals such as keeping you team ERA under 3.5 or pitching a shut-out.

On the other hand, MLB 2K10’s new MLB Today feature shines really well for those who want to sync up with the real MLB. With an Internet connection, you can keep your game fully updated with the latest rosters, scratches, and injuries.

Innovations:

There are couple things improved and upgraded in this edition and they all contribute greatly to the excitement of the game. The one aspect that has seen an upgrade is in the pickoff game. You now have control over how you attempt a pickoff. Instead of just blindly lobbing balls to the plate, you’ll have the option to throw at specific speeds.

In the Road to the Show mode, players can take on the role of a catcher and call every pitch. The ability to become a catcher is a bold new addition to the game, not only providing you a fresh perspective on what’s happening, but also heightening the drama.

Longevity:

The replay value is very high for this game. Franchise, Road to the Show and online play are what will consume most of your time and all three are strong this year. Being a manager to lead your favorite team for the World Series or fostering your custom-made athlete to his full extend form Minors to Majors, you will find yourself fully immersed and rewarded in this game.

Conclusion:

MLB 10: The Show is not perfect, but it is close to perfect. Its foundation is solid and the improvements are promising. The developers keep building the game upwards to create an experience both baseball fans and videogame fans would enjoy. Though the gap between the two titles has narrowed, Sony’s game is still in a league of its own. However, MLB 2k10 should still able to draw some crowd with it multiplatform option since MLB: The Show is a PS3 exclusive.

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