(www.lostplanet2game.com) Rated T for Teen by ESRB. Taking place on the fictional planet of E.D.N. III, various human factions continue to fight over resources among themselves and with the alien Akrids. Taking comments and suggestions from their loyal fans, the chaos ensues with inputs from Capcom’s online community. The direction of the game is completely different when compared to Lost Planet: Extreme Condition, with Lost Planet 2 far more focused on delivering a playing experience accompanied by great sounds and graphics than anything else.

 (www.lostplanet2game.com) Rated T for Teen by ESRB. Taking place on the fictional planet of E.D.N. III, various human factions continue to fight over resources among themselves and with the alien Akrids. Taking comments and suggestions from their loyal fans, the chaos ensues with inputs from Capcom’s online community. The direction of the game is completely different when compared to Lost Planet: Extreme Condition, with Lost Planet 2 far more focused on delivering a playing experience accompanied by great sounds and graphics than anything else.

Presentation:
Lost Planet 2 brings the player back to the planet of E.D.N. III – which has just begun showing changes under human terraforming efforts. The story keeps the player tuned in with short, action-oriented clips through the viewpoint of different warring factions; which is supposedly a direct continuation… but never mind all that, because the actions are more important! In the campaign mode, available for single or multi-player, the player will fight against other humans, mechs, and gigantic aliens through its 6 episodes each containing 3 to 4 chapters. The commendable story, despite its attention-drawing pieces-of-the-whole-picture storytelling, is easily dwarfed by the intense gameplay. The background however gives more than compelling reasons to keep blasting through it all.

Graphics:
Utilizing a new version of MT-Framework engine used for Devil May Cry 4 and Resident Evil 5, Lost Planet 2’s graphics are simply astounding and breathtaking. All of the cut-scenes and in game graphics are generated real time. Even with the immense amount of models and visual effects, the frame rate keeps up very well with all the intensive actions. To garnish on top of the splendid visual presentation, all of your customizations will be reflected in all the cut scenes and in-game actions. From the awarded snow pirate leader head you put on your character to a newly outfitted plasma rifle II, these are all reflected in the game.

Also, the model and environmental designs are truly unique and distinctive.  For any Sci-fi fans, this game will be an enticing treat from the futuristic armors to the menacing aliens. Besides characters and models, this game was designed with the utmost care to every bits of detail. The individual flickering lights on your mech-style Vital Suits and the slimy gluttonous texture on the sacs of the alien Akrids are some of shining examples of carefully crafted details on both organic and mechanic details within the game. To further the enhance to the credibility of the environments, weather effects like rain drops on the camera, moving foliage and grass, and howling sandstorms adds to the immersive environments. As the scenery switches between snowfield, desert, jungle, war-torn cities, and space, there is not a dull pixel in the background.

       

Sounds:
The musical score and most of the theme are truly inspirational and moving. The main theme and a majority of the scores are written by Jamie Christopherson who composed the score for the first Lost Planet. Christopherson decided to utilize a 96 piece live orchestra to help record the theme – one of the largest orchestra used for a video game title theme. When you hear the theme in game, you feel like you are part of a glorious military operation and it gives a sense of belonging. More of the scores should have been used during the gameplay to emphasize the scale and efforts used for the music instead of just cut scenes and menus.

The sound effects of the armaments are accurately depicted. Each weapon’s sound effects give a good indicator to the fire power it will unleash on your enemies. These weapon sound effects play a vital role in satisfaction when you upgrade different weapons. For the fans of mechs and giant robots, every vital suits movements and computer voices corresponds with a unique sound effect. These sounds make the feel of piloting different vital suits a rewarding and distinctive experience. As for the piercing screams and roars of the alien Akrids, they are well fitted and portray different sizes and danger of these aliens.

Gameplay:
If it wasn’t obvious before, Lost Planet 2 is indeed a shooter. This third-person shooter however takes quite some inspiration from Capcom’s very own Monster Hunter series. On the back of the box, it has the word “big,” “colossal,” and “enormous,” all in reference to the physical dimension of the opposition. Especially toward the end of the campaign, all the enemies stand several hundred feet over. But the clever map design avoids the usual problems with big monsters – it is fairly easy to find a spot where shooting straight up is not required.

Also like Monster Hunter, Lost Planet 2 is best played with others even though the enemies aren’t quite as tough. It is because the AI-controlled allies have the tendency to get in the way of the action – accidentally ending up behind an ally while shooting off a rocket and killing oneself in the process can be frustrating easy to achieve in a single player game.

       

Innovation:
Lost Planet 2 is all about group play, whether it is against the game or other players. Its best aspects are about playing with others. The competitive multiplayer has all the standard modes but with the Lost Planet flavor, they also come with a considerate set of customizable rules. Its faction battle modes, a collection of modes that put players in one of the game’s five competing factions, further reflect the ongoing wars on E.D.N. III.

Longevity:
As designed, Lost Planet 2 serves as the game that is more fun to play once every so often as supposed to putting in hundreds of hours in the shortest period possible. That is because the length of the game is rather limited, which makes it perfect for shorter gaming sessions. The story campaign episodes are nicely divided into 30-45 minutes long chapters, and the competitive multiplayer battles are also similar in length – except for the faction modes, which demand extensive collaborated effort for rewarding results.

For those more oriented toward co-operative play, the charm of Lost Planet 2’s replayability doesn’t come in until the campaign is finished at which it allows the player to use a customized character. From there, it becomes a game of credit-farming in order to get new character parts, weapons, abilities, etc. The wealth of the customization library provides another reason to go back to the game besides co-operation fun, or it may just become an addiction.

       

Conclusion:
Lost Planet 2 doesn’t strike as a game that would appeal to dedicated fans of any genres despite being highly entertaining, because it is quite far outside of the box when compared to the mold of the currently popular titles. But its attractiveness is at its multiplayer, the long-lost camaraderie of human players against challenges presented by a game!

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