(Edited from Xinhua, Pyongyan) The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) has asked the United Nations Security Council to help find the truth behind the sinking of the South Korean corvette Cheonan in March, official media reported Wednesday.

“The key to resolving the case lies in that the DPRK has an opportunity to verify and confirm the investigation result on a scientific and objective basis,” Sin Son Ho, DPRK’s permanent representative to the UN, said in a message sent Tuesday to Security Council chairman Claude Heller, the Korean Central News Agency reported.

(Edited from Xinhua, Pyongyan) The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) has asked the United Nations Security Council to help find the truth behind the sinking of the South Korean corvette Cheonan in March, official media reported Wednesday.

“The key to resolving the case lies in that the DPRK has an opportunity to verify and confirm the investigation result on a scientific and objective basis,” Sin Son Ho, DPRK’s permanent representative to the UN, said in a message sent Tuesday to Security Council chairman Claude Heller, the Korean Central News Agency reported.

“No one would dare imagine how serious its consequences would be” for the peace and security on the Korean Peninsula, he added.

Cheonan sank on March 26 off South Korea’s western coast after an explosion. Forty-six sailors were killed.

South Korea said after completing investigation that the warship was torpedoed by the DPRK. Pyongyang denied any involvement in the incident.

South Korea Approves to Send Powdered Milk to DPRK
On the other hand, South Korea has approved to send two shipments of powered milk to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), Seoul’s Ministry of Unification said on Wednesday.

The shipments of baby food for infants, sponsored by two civic groups, will be sent as humanitarian aid to the DPRK, the first since Seoul announced to take punitive measures against the DPRK for the sinking of the warship Cheonan.

The some $320,000 worth of powered milk and other items will be dispatched to North Hamgyeong Province and Pyongyang late this month, ministry spokeswoman Lee Jong-joo said in a press briefing.

Lee added that the ministry also approved some 34 shipments of shoes and clothes produced in the joint industrial complex in Kaesong, a border city in the DPRK, to the South. 

Those productions were all manufactured with materials sent from the South before Seoul announced to take “firm countermeasures” against Pyongyang, she added.

South Korea last month unveiled a series of punitive measures against the DPRK over the Cheonan incident, including downsizing the operation of the Kaesong park, suspending all inter-Korean cooperation apart from the Kaesong program, and relaunching psychological warfare against Pyongyang; after it made the outcome of investigations over the Cheonan incident made by a multinational team public, which said the warship went into waters near a tense maritime border with the DPRK in March was torpedoed by the DPRK. But the DPRK denied its involvement.

From AP, Seoul – North Korea’s main newspaper printed photographs and biographical details Tuesday of senior officials appointed a day earlier at a rare parliamentary session.

The brother-in-law of leader Kim Jong Il was promoted to a key position in the secretive nation’s leadership and a new premier was named Monday.

North Koreans looked at the Rodong Sinmun newspaper on display stands in Pyongyang, according to exclusive footage from broadcaster APTN in Pyongyang. The front page featured a large photo of Kim Jong Il and other senior officials presiding over Monday’s parliamentary session.

The reclusive Kim is believed to have suffered a stroke two years ago.

Inside pages contained photos of the country’s new premier, Choe Yong Rim, and of Kim Jong Il’s brother-in-law, Jang Song Thaek. Jang was newly appointed as a vice chairman of the powerful National Defense Commission, which makes security policy. Kim Jong Il is the chairman.

Jang, married to Kim’s younger sister, is widely believed to be a key backer of the North Korean leader’s third son, Kim Jong Un. South Korean media reports and analysts think Jong Un will be his father’s eventual successor. Jang, meanwhile, is seen as possibly leading a collective leadership in the event of Kim’s death until a successor takes over.

Jang already had immense power as the head of intelligence and as political overlord of the prosecutor’s office, police and courts.

The newspaper also published photos and brief biographical details of six other high-level appointments of vice premiers and ministers.

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