(Edited from AP) It’s a familiar refrain in homes with teenagers: “Shut off that television, get outside and get some exercise!”

But parents, here’s the bad news: If you want your teens to exercise, you need to get out there with them and show how it’s done.

(Edited from AP) It’s a familiar refrain in homes with teenagers: “Shut off that television, get outside and get some exercise!”

But parents, here’s the bad news: If you want your teens to exercise, you need to get out there with them and show how it’s done.

“Parents have an incredible, powerful ability to model behavior,” says Daniel Kirschenbaum, a professor at Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago and clinical director of Wellspring.

Besides being active, parents may need to get creative. And tough. Experts offer a variety of strategies for getting teenagers out for some fresh air.

Even the word “exercise” can induce adolescent eye-rolling, so substitute that word with “adventure,” Sacks says.

Or less subtle: Kirschenbaum advises making outdoor family time mandatory, and tying it to allowances.

“It’s another thing they have to do, like make their beds,” he says. “I’d encourage families to do that, make movement a part of what’s required.”

The problem is often one of wresting teens away from screens and phones. Teenagers up to age 18 are exposed to nearly 11 hours of media in a typical day.

And don’t hesitate to call for backup: Allow the child to bring a friend along on the outdoor adventure.

“They’re looking for ways to spend time with their friends,” says Spizman, who recommends inviting the friend’s family, too.

Other kids may prefer a more private foray into nature. “An introspective and bookish child” may prefer journal writing in a secluded spot, says Christopher. “OK, great. How do we get to this place? Let’s get on a bike and take a bike trail.”

Kirschenbaum suggests buying an inexpensive pedometer for each member of the family.

“Get one for everybody and have steps become a part of the language of the family,” he says. He recommends that families work toward 10,000 steps a day, about 5 miles, which he says is double what most adults walk in a day.

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