(Edited from AP) More and more couples are finding themselves working from home, thanks to the rise of telecommuting and the downsizing of many full-time jobs. So how to cope with 24/7 togetherness?

Clinical psychologist Judy Kuriansky, who has given relationship advice as an author (”The Complete Idiot’s Guide to a Healthy Relationship”) and as host of a syndicated radio call-in show, says there are practical and psychological issues to be resolved when couples live and work together.

(Edited from AP) More and more couples are finding themselves working from home, thanks to the rise of telecommuting and the downsizing of many full-time jobs. So how to cope with 24/7 togetherness?

Clinical psychologist Judy Kuriansky, who has given relationship advice as an author (”The Complete Idiot’s Guide to a Healthy Relationship”) and as host of a syndicated radio call-in show, says there are practical and psychological issues to be resolved when couples live and work together.

Guidelines from Kuriansky for couples working from home:

1. Discuss the practical and emotional issues that come up from working in such close quarters. Those can include resentment, fear, humiliation, money worries and childcare. Set aside a couple of hours a week at a set time for such discussions, or consult with a professional or outside party.

2. Spend some time apart. Go to the gym, to the market or for a walk.

3. Find a place outside the home where you can work when necessary; many libraries, schools and cafes offer wireless Internet service.

Many couples who work from home, however, say that ending the workday can be difficult. Some say they set a time for turning off computers and office phones, and closing the office door, if there is one.

However, we all need to face the fact that we live in a weird modern world where work and life are not clearly divisible.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here