Trauma Team (Wii) Review – Available Now

(www.atlus.com/traumateam/) Rated T for Teen by ESRB. Ever since Nintendo released the Wii, developers have been trying to utilize its motion sensitive technology to the best of their ability. Finally, we’ve been given a game that uses the Wii’s unique control system in a fun and innovative way that isn’t gimmicky or awkward at all. Game Developer Atlus brings us the newest rendition of the Trauma Center series with Trauma Team for the Wii. In Trauma Team you will take control of six different doctors with six different specialties in order to save lives and eventually fight off a deadly virus.

(www.atlus.com/traumateam/) Rated T for Teen by ESRB. Ever since Nintendo released the Wii, developers have been trying to utilize its motion sensitive technology to the best of their ability. Finally, we’ve been given a game that uses the Wii’s unique control system in a fun and innovative way that isn’t gimmicky or awkward at all. Game Developer Atlus brings us the newest rendition of the Trauma Center series with Trauma Team for the Wii. In Trauma Team you will take control of six different doctors with six different specialties in order to save lives and eventually fight off a deadly virus.

Presentation:
Trauma Team takes place in the fictional Resurgam Hospital in Cumberland Maine and follows the story of six doctors. Throughout the course of gameplay you will participate in orthopedic, endoscopic, and regular surgery as well as first response emergency care, diagnostic medicine, and forensic pathology. Each character has a unique personality and storyline and each story merges with each other leading up to a finale in which you have to use the skills of each doctor so solve a pandemic. The story is very well told, but the cutscenes sometimes have a tendency to be drawn out and could have been much faster paced. But in the end, the game sets up a wonderful scenario in which you, as a player, are much more immersed in how it feels to save lives as a doctor.

       

Graphics:
The surgery portions of the game are rendered in a semi-realistic 3d style. Blood and guts are conservatively drawn in order to keep gore to a minimum, but the rest of the human body is rendered anatomically correct to keep the illusion of actual surgery as intact as possible. Although Trauma Team makes an attempt at westernizing the Trauma Center, but is still has an undeniable Asian undertone. The most noticeable detail being that all the cutscenes are drawn in an anime style that flicks from scene to scene like a comic book. Though different from most games today, these animated cutscenes do the game justice and present the characters very well.

Sounds:
While the sounds of Trauma Team aren’t at the forefront of your thought as you play the game, they are an omnipresent feature that really helps make the game more intense. During much of the cutscenes, sounds will happen that indicate events happening out of sight of the picture and gives you almost the same feeling as the radio shows of old, where you had to use your imagination to figure out what isn’t being shown to you. Additionally, during gameplay, you may or may not notice the sound of the patient’s vitals. As the surgery progresses and the vitals drop, the heart beats faster and the notorious medical beeping will increase. Without even looking at the patient’s vitals, you can use your ear to realize that you are in trouble.

       

Gameplay:
Gameplay is divided into six very distinct types of play. How you will play is determined by the character that you are playing as. At the beginning of the game, you can pick and choose between the six doctors, but once you have completed each doctor’s unique story, you unlock a final scenario in which you will have to use the skills of each doctor to finish the game.

During normal surgery you will use tools like the scalpel, laser, syringe, and many others to save a patient from a disease or condition that is directly threatening their life. This type of gameplay is very straightforward and most similar to the previous Trauma Center games.

During orthopedic surgery, you will operate on the bones of patients, resetting broken bones, drilling holes, and screwing in plates and such. Due to the precise nature of orthopedic surgery, rather than monitor the patient’s vitals, you have a limited number of times that you can miss any section of the procedure before you fail. And you can also gain a bonus for “chaining” sections together flawlessly.

As a first response medical technician, you won’t have to worry about as complex procedures as the other surgeons, but you will have to juggle multiple patients at a time. Rather than curing them entirely, your job is to stabilize as many patients as possible so they can be sent to the hospital. This section of the game is the most intense and requires you to think of multiple things at one time.

For endoscopic surgery you will have to use an endoscope to explore your patient, removing tumors, curing ulcers, and stopping hemorrhaging. The controls for this section are radically different from all the others and involve making a thrusting motion with the wiimote to move the endoscope further into the patient while maneuvering it with the control stick on the nunchuk. This section is by far the most unique and is surprisingly fun and enjoyable.

The last two types of gameplay are forensics and diagnostics and are very different from the other four types. During the diagnostic section you do not actually do anything to the patient. Instead, you only make observations about the condition of the patient by interviewing them, observing their body, checking their chart, and viewing different scans of their body. You then match the observed symptoms to a list of medical problems to diagnose the patient. With forensics, you also only observe. However you investigate dead bodies, voice recordings, and crime scenes and then piece together the evidence to come to a conclusion on what happened. Both of these styles are very relaxed and are pass/fail unlike the surgeries, where you are graded based on performance.

       

Longevity:
Trauma Team is filled with a plethora of options to extend gameplay, should you decide you want more time to play the game. But that will probably be unnecessary because playing the game through the game just once will probably take you at least 15 hours. Should you decide that one game through is not enough to satisfy your need to feel like a doctor, beating the game once will unlock the “specialist” difficulty, where even the easy surgeries become excruciatingly difficult to complete. Also, you can earn medals for completing extra hidden tasks that are quite difficult. And by completing the game, you additionally unlock a funny audio clip for each character. Trauma Team definitely has potential to take many hours before it has completely exhausted its entertainment.

Conclusion:
Trauma Team is definitely an amazing title for the Nintendo Wii. With six different play styles, an amazing story, and perfect usage of the Wii’s motion controls, it’s definitely a great game. The most amazing aspect of this game is that the motion controls are extremely prominent, yet aren’t unnecessary like other Wii titles. Trauma Team would be impossible to release on any other console on the market today and is a truly unique and enjoyable experience.

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