(http://nisamerica.com/games/trinityuniverse/) Rated T for Teen by ESRB.  Nippon Ichi, Gust, and Idea Factory had this idea of bringing together a bunch of their characters from other games into one title – they did and Trinity Universe is the result. While the game is lovely in its own right, but playing Trinity Universe without being a walking NIS encyclopedia can be summarized as the following: being a stranger in a group of long time friends while they crack inside jokes non-stop.

(http://nisamerica.com/games/trinityuniverse/Rated T for Teen by ESRB.  Nippon Ichi, Gust, and Idea Factory had this idea of bringing together a bunch of their characters from other games into one title – they did and Trinity Universe is the result. While the game is lovely in its own right, but playing Trinity Universe without being a walking NIS encyclopedia can be summarized as the following: being a stranger in a group of long time friends while they crack inside jokes non-stop.

Presentation:
Since the theme is “mix and match,” the game’s “Netheruniverse” is a convenient dimension where all sorts of things drift in and out. Also convenient is that it requires saving, it wouldn’t make much sense otherwise since the character roster is filled with hilariously two-dimensional protagonists from other works. The game pokes fun at itself for being a game every chance it got outside of the melodramatic plot and attempted character-depth, and lines like “You’ll regret encountering me randomly!!” are about as genuine as it gets.

 

Graphics:
The visual style is reminiscent of the PS1/2 era with clear and sharp cel-shaded models for the field, and animated 2D figures for portraits during the dialogues. The portraits themselves are however worth mentioning, because of the “breathing animation” given to the characters creates an extra touch of liveliness.

       

Sounds:
The enjoyableness of music of Trinity Universe is more dependent upon the listener’s preference than in most other situations, because its standard-Japanese-anime-fare styled theme song is played so often, including all its variations. But beyond that, all other tracks are welcomed and a pleasure to listen to. The voice acting, which covers the main story only, is over the top in characterizing the extravagant characters.

Gameplay:
Despite the simplistic plot and presentation, the gameplay actually gets pretty complicated. This is where the developers made good use of the extra space provided by the blue-ray format. Even with a straight forward synthesis system, it’s near impossible to try and track down specific items without using a guide. The battles appear to be the outdated turn-based RPG fighting with the classic screen breaking alert and two-line two-side setup, but it’s only a facade to cover up the far more demanding system that requires good memory and planning in order to master.

       

Innovation:
Ground breaking, no; but there are plenty of features previously not found in RPGs. The battle system, for example, uses an easy to understand but intense button pressing system to replace the traditional heavy menus. With evolved systems all around, even RPG veterans may find Trinity Universe slightly confusing to begin with.

       

Longevity:
The story itself takes quite a while to finish, and it is rather hard to rush through the game because of the sharp increase in difficulty as the game progresses. Plus the two protagonists each have their own storyline, making a second playthrough much more acceptable. Furthermore, a lot of time is spent repeating the dungeons to collect loots for the purpose of upgrading equipments and leveling. So even though Trinity Universe may not be a shining star in sheer entertainment value, it definitely makes up for it in terms of game hours.

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