Q: I have a huge swarm of bees trying to make a home in my tree!  I don’t want to harm the bees but how can I get rid of them?

A: Swarming honey bees are not an uncommon sight during the early growing season.   They swarm because they have outgrown their hive and have decided to look for a suitable new home with additional space to house the burgeoning colony.  Fortunately, as intimidating as tens of thousands of bees in one location can look, swarming honey bees are pretty docile and preoccupied. All the worker bees surrounding the queen bee are full of honey stores and they are intent on one thing–finding a new home and fast! 

 

Q: I have a huge swarm of bees trying to make a home in my tree!  I don’t want to harm the bees but how can I get rid of them?

A: Swarming honey bees are not an uncommon sight during the early growing season.   They swarm because they have outgrown their hive and have decided to look for a suitable new home with additional space to house the burgeoning colony.  Fortunately, as intimidating as tens of thousands of bees in one location can look, swarming honey bees are pretty docile and preoccupied. All the worker bees surrounding the queen bee are full of honey stores and they are intent on one thing–finding a new home and fast! 

Fortunately, there is a network of local beekeepers out there that are ready to help.  Puget Sound Beekeepers Association has a list available on their website called the “Swarm List” (www.psbees.org).  There you will find contact information for beekeepers that have pledged to respond to a swarm call immediately.  They will arrive at your door ready to capture the swarm and take their new colony home with them—quite a sight to see!  It is a great deal for the beekeeper as it eliminates the need to buy packaged bees to start a new hive and it is beneficial for the honey bees as well.  An experienced beekeeper has the ability to ensure the continued health of the bees and protect these important pollinators.

 


Laura Matter, Natural Soil Building Program Manager at The Garden Hotline
The Garden Hotline can be reached at 206-633-0224, Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Questions can also be emailed to help@gardenhotline.org.
More information can be found at http://www.gardenhotline.org/

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here