(Edited from China Daily, Shanghai) The return of Shanghai Nightmare – one of the first American-style haunted houses in China – will certainly give Shanghai residents a horror story to remember.

This haunted house with its ghouls, ghosts, a stomach-churning “beheading room” and other props such as a jailhouse door for a dread-imbued ambience is contained in a 108-year-old building next to Suzhou Creek.

(Edited from China Daily, Shanghai) The return of Shanghai Nightmare – one of the first American-style haunted houses in China – will certainly give Shanghai residents a horror story to remember.

This haunted house with its ghouls, ghosts, a stomach-churning “beheading room” and other props such as a jailhouse door for a dread-imbued ambience is contained in a 108-year-old building next to Suzhou Creek.

Shanghai Nightmare’s dedicated “scream team” has only one mission – to scare the living daylights out of any of the paying guests foolhardy enough to laugh the affair off as pure smoke and mirrors, all in the name of fun, of course.

“Most haunted houses in China lack good storylines, but we have placed a heavy accent on grim plots, striking lighting and atmospheric sound effects,” says co-founder Gan Quan.

“There are a couple of scenario and each of them has a storyline. Visitors are also invited to be part of the narrative. For example, in one of our chamber, you’ll be told to turn to the girl’s wardrobe, which is also the channel linking to the next scenario, to help her find something.”

After squeezing into the little girl’s closet and trying to navigate between two inflatable walls as chilly currents fill the air, guests enter a smoky, laser-lit forest before winding their way through a spinning tube splattered with Day-Glo paint.

“We visited around 20 to 30 haunted houses in the US to study their special effects and we took classes at HauntCon – a tradeshow for the US haunted house industry – to learn how to build and manage it,” says Gan, who grew up in the United States and started building his first frightful house of bugs, bloodsuckers and hair-raisers last Halloween.

This year, Gan solicited expertise from Erebus Haunted Attraction, which has held the Guinness World Record for the “World’s Largest Walk-Through Haunted Attraction” for five years, to make sure it’s a good year for the business in Shanghai.

Gan also works with his art-director girlfriend Xu Jiali on the haunted-house project, and says there is a promising niche in the Chinese market.

“There was no Halloween atmosphere in the air and there was nobody out trick-or-treating. So we wanted to introduce this to Shanghai, because we feel the people here are ready for it.”

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here