Time Crisis: Razing Storm (PS3 Move) Review – Available Now

(http://www.time-crisis.com/)  Rated T for Teen by ESRB. With the accurate aiming device that is PlayStation Move, of course all the rail-shooter series hadn’t have a chance to release a game on the Wii will have to take advantage of this opportunity. The Move compatible Time Crisis: Razing Storm is a bundle that puts together three titles, including the arcade versions of Time Crisis 4 and Deadstorm Pirates.  The whole package is more like 4 games altogether, even if they are all short ones. Time Crisis 4, Deadstorm Pirates, and Razing Storm’s Aracade Mode are all rail-shooters; but Razing Storm also offers a story mode that plays like an FPS with the player also controlling the movement. With all that gaming material, just don’t expect a soul-bonding emotional adventure that will have people bawl like babies.

 

 

(http://www.time-crisis.com/)  Rated T for Teen by ESRB. With the accurate aiming device that is PlayStation Move, of course all the rail-shooter series hadn’t have a chance to release a game on the Wii will have to take advantage of this opportunity. The Move compatible Time Crisis: Razing Storm is a bundle that puts together three titles, including the arcade versions of Time Crisis 4 and Deadstorm Pirates.

 

Presentation:
The whole package is more like 4 games altogether, even if they are all short ones. Time Crisis 4, Deadstorm Pirates, and Razing Storm’s Aracade Mode are all rail-shooters; but Razing Storm also offers a story mode that plays like an FPS with the player also controlling the movement. With all that gaming material, just don’t expect a soul-bonding emotional adventure that will have people bawl like babies.

Graphics:
Time Crisis 4 and Deadstorm Pirates appear to be an accurate recreation of their previous selves. They are however, still far superior to the Wii rail-shooters of the classic flavor. Razing Storm, on the other hand, has slightly better detail and more up to date graphics. Though being released so close to the Move itself, there just wasn’t a whole lot of time went into touching up the game.

Gameplay:
The rail-shooting is fairly solid if a bit dry. It’s all about pointing to the enemies and pulling/holding down the trigger. The enemies are all located at the some spots every game as well, making these games more about memorizing rather than developing skill or reaction rate. Given the nearly non-existing stories and simple gameplay, these games are still better shared with a friend. But unfortunately Time Crisis 4’s 2-player mode can be hard to see because of its tiny split screen displays, even though the aiming still remains dead on.

Razing Storm’s story mode is a beast of its own. Using the DualShock, the game is more than playable, though not outstanding. Using the Move controller, it’s more of a frustration than an entertainment. Here are some reasons: the game features a cover system that requires a swift and accurate motion tilting the controller upward, and any likely mistake will have the character look up at the sky like a dying pagan while bullets rain down on him from everywhere else. The cover system can be avoided if need to, but the basic aiming of the game is also incredibly unpolished. Moving the aiming causes the crosshair to follow, when the crosshair reaches an edge of the screen it then rotates rapidly, all without an option to adjust. It just becomes nearly impossible to hit anything off-screen before they kill you three times over.

Conclusion:
With all the frustrations and not so much content, the asking price of Time Crisis: Razing Storm maybe high even for the most die hard fans. If it were $20 cheaper, then it could be a worthy rail-shooter to keep as it offers a few different settings to break up the monotony other console rail-shooters suffer from.

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