The hostile relations between China and Tibet is no news, and neither is international intervention.
This week, Chinese government criticized British Prime Minister David Cameron for meeting exiled Tibetan leader Dalai Lama in London on Monday, saying that his action has damaged the ties between the two countries.

 

The hostile relations between China and Tibet is no news, and neither is international intervention.

This week, Chinese government criticized British Prime Minister David Cameron for meeting exiled Tibetan leader Dalai Lama in London on Monday, saying that his action has damaged the ties between the two countries.

Yes, China has been frustrated with the situation in Tibet for a long time. At self-immolation? Maybe. But more accurately, China is tired of people sticking their noses into its business.

At many human rights protests in this country, people often chant “free Tibet.” But how many really understand the long history between China and Tibet, and the kind of freedom Tibetans want?

The foreign relation of Tibet with China can be traced all the way back to Tang Dynasty, about 1500 years ago. Though Tibet might have appeared to be inferior from all the tributes paid to China, the two were stand alone countries with respect to their borders.

Fast forward to 1400s, Tibet became an independent tributary during the Ming Dynasty. The Chinese emperor had full sovereignty over the region and relations remained mutually beneficial for another 500 years.

When the Qing Dynasty was overthrown in 1911, the new Chinese government was too busy to claim a direct rule over Tibet and Tibetans viewed themselves as independent. It was until the invasion by the People’s Liberation Army in 1950 then the relations became hostile.

Once involved only two parties, now the political drama between Tibet and China was put on the international stage. When China initiated bloodshed against Tibetans, Dalai Lama would seek help from Britain and the U.S., asking for recognition on its independence.

Yet, the bountiful natural resource in the Tibetan Plateau is no secret to the powerful countries that offer help. Without China, will Tibet finally be independent or just another tributary in a different form? If Tibetans and Chinese were able to respect each other presence and culture for many centuries, why must they go on their own ways now?

It all seems right for foreigners to help when humanity is being threatened. With all the support worldwide, the idea of Tibet as an independent country is at its loudest right now. We say that Tibet has its own religion, language and political system. To ensure freedom, it needs to be separated from China. However, more than anything, peace is what Tibetans want.

Rather than fussing over to add another country on the world map, it would be the best for foreign powers to take a step back and let the two countries find the best solution to reestablish the once functional Sino-Tibet relations.

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