Time for another lesson!  I hope you aren’t burnt out yet; the exciting stuff like actually creating projects is right around the corner.  For now, we’ll focus on the invisible decrease.

Time for another lesson!  I hope you aren’t burnt out yet; the exciting stuff like actually creating projects is right around the corner.  For now, we’ll focus on the invisible decrease.

The invisible decrease presents an interesting challenge: it can only be used when crocheting on a certain side of your work.  When I first started crocheting, I would work my rounds in this direction (counterclockwise):

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However, I hated the way the regular decrease looked.  It left ugly bumps and gaps in my work where the stuffing would poke through.  So, I turned to the invisible decrease and used a smaller hook than normal, eliminating bumps and gaps simultaneously.  In order to do this, you have to work in a clockwise direction on your piece, which is only possible after turning the piece inside out and working on the “outside”. 

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While this type of turning inside out is only done in the round, the invisible decrease applies to straight row work as well.  We’ll learn the stitch now, then figure out what to do about working in the round in the next few articles.

To start, chain 25 stitches and single crochet in each stitch.  Chain 1 at the end of your row.  In case you’re wondering, this is just a standard way to practice, not how you start every stitch.  Chaining 25 stitches will give you 25 eventual single crochets, which is plenty to practice with.

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Insert your hook into one side of the next single crochet.  The single crochet is a v-like shape with two sides, or edges.  You want to insert your hook behind one of these edges.  You’ll have to swing the hook down from your last stitch in order to come directly up through the stitch.  You now have two loops on your hook.

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Swing your hook down and up through the next stitch in the exact same way.  You now have three loops on your hook.

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Yarn over, and pull through the FIRST two loops on your hook.  Do not pull through the last loop.  You will be left with two loops.

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Yarn over again, and pull through the last two loops on your hook.  You will be left with one loop and a completed invisible decrease!

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Here’s a side-by-side of an invisible decrease compared to a regular decrease.  You’ll notice the stitches on the left of the piece (normal decrease) are bumpier and larger than those on the right (invisible decrease).

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Work the entire row with invisible decreases, ending with 12 stitches.  Keep practicing, because we’re almost ready for a creation of our own!

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