rhubarb pieIf you have been reading the Seattle Chinese Times for a while, you might feel surprised to see that green narrow “FYI” column appeared on our front page two months ago. That was only one of the fewer things added onto our newspaper after I became the English editor onboard.

rhubarb pieIf you have been reading the Seattle Chinese Times for a while, you might feel surprised to see that green narrow “FYI” column appeared on our front page two months ago. That was only one of the fewer things added onto our newspaper after I became the English editor onboard.

Over last year, I had the opportunities to try out many new ideas on the newspaper. On our lifestyle section, first it was “Behind the Scenes”, a biweekly column that features stories of local business owners, followed by regular reviews on mainstream movies. As for the news section, on top of “FYI”, a bite-sized news column, “911Crime Watch” has been added on our local news pages.

As a media outlet, it is our responsibilities to scoop the ups and downs in our surroundings, documenting the life journeys of Asian Americans. Our reporters attend events and gatherings, aiming to build connections and hear from different neighborhoods.  

Everything you see on the newspaper is a result of great teamwork. It may sound like a big cliché, but none of these would have happened without the support of my talented co-workers. Freshly graduated from college last spring, my work at this publication has been an eye opener. It has been a great ride really, but it is about time for me to move on to a new chapter—graduate school.

In the period of transition, the new editor asked, “So Jocelyn, in your opinion, what is the voice of this newspaper?”

It was the first time I paused and thought about the answer to this question.

When it comes down to it, the newspaper wants to present many life options available within the American culture at the readers’ doorstep, such as recipes, activities, fashion trends or even career paths.

On my last day at work, walking into the office holding onto a pizza box, I decided to challenge everyone’s palate. Without a thought, people immediately expected pizza for lunch. Yet, when I opened the box, there laid a strawberry rhubarb pie.

At many western households, rhubarb is a familiar ingredient for pie making. Yet, to many Chinese, this reddish plant is almost unheard of, or at least not on their usual dessert menu. This is exactly the reason for my choice.

The options are clear for my co-workers—either leave the pie on the table or dig their forks into this new flavor—and of course, they did the latter. Our two 70-something-year-old Chinese editors were even the first ones to try it without hesitation.

Indeed, this is the attitude of our staff and the voice of this newspaper. While we do our best to provide you, our readers, with the utmost interesting ideas, ultimately we want to hear that you have taken the step and tried out some of these new options. Then, together, we can all learn to appreciate each other’s presence and embrace the uncertainties in life.

Cheers!

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