Lola Versus posterWith the success of the film “Bridesmaids” last year and the critically acclaimed HBO show “Girls,” now is the time for writers to develop female-driven comedies for the screen. It’s a shame that the new film “Lola Versus” is a weak addition to this trend of comedies about flawed yet charming funny girls.

Lola Versus posterWith the success of the film “Bridesmaids” last year and the critically acclaimed HBO show “Girls,” now is the time for writers to develop female-driven comedies for the screen. It’s a shame that the new film “Lola Versus” is a weak addition to this trend of comedies about flawed yet charming funny girls.

Three weeks before her wedding, 29-year old Lola (Greta Gerwig) is dumped by her fiancé Luke (Joel Kinnaman) and careens into a state of crisis. Her post-breakup life is filled with sexual escapades, late-night drinking, and awkward attempts to reconnect with Luke.

“Lola Versus” mirrors the personality of its protagonist. It is neurotic, self-aware, and begs for attention. The film tries too hard to be offbeat by overplaying its character’s quirks, which neither reveal anything important about them nor help contribute to the story. Lola’s best friend Alice (Zoe Lister Jones, who co-wrote the script) frequently adds cheeky remarks into conversation, which never seem natural.

The term “story” seems more appropriate than “plot” because the film’s events do not relate to one another in any significant pattern or sequence. When Lola’s engagement ends, she finds a job as a waitress at the café her mother owns and begins work on her dissertation about the use of silence in 19th century French literature. Besides her inability to move beyond her breakup, there is nothing at stake in the film and viewers are left to wonder what the point of this story is.

Although Gerwig’s performance is solid, her character cannot make up for the film’s plot-less narrative. Some comedies can have a simple premise that works as more of a character study than a plot-oriented film. For example, the title character of the film “Juno” carried that film; she was clever, engaging, and her dialogue flowed smoothly. Most importantly, she was relatable to audiences, an underdog with all the odds against her.

Lola is not such a character. For almost an hour and a half, viewers watch her complain her way through New York City, whining about being abandoned by her handsome boyfriend. But unless you’re a white, upper-middle class, college-educated, employed female whose biggest obstacle is moving on from a relationship, good luck relating to Lola.

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