That's My BoyThere is a redundant formula used in most of Adam Sandler’s films, a compilation of, but not exclusive to: sexual innuendos, lewd jokes, teenage boy fantasy comes true, and half naked women. Directed by Sean Anders, That’s My Boy pays plenty of homage to the tendencies of a usual Happy Madison Production, filled with Sandler’s humor and outrageous plot ideas. Although that formula may have worked more convincingly in the past, it struggles to persuade this time around.

 

That's My BoyThere is a redundant formula used in most of Adam Sandler’s films, a compilation of, but not exclusive to: sexual innuendos, lewd jokes, teenage boy fantasy comes true, and half naked women. Directed by Sean Anders, That’s My Boy pays plenty of homage to the tendencies of a usual Happy Madison Production, filled with Sandler’s humor and outrageous plot ideas. Although that formula may have worked more convincingly in the past, it struggles to persuade this time around.

Donny Berger (Adam Sandler) became a media sensation when his student-teacher affair led him to father a child with his middle school math teacher. Despite the scandalous nature of the situation, teenage Donny spends the next few years showered in the limelight of media attention, and improvising his parenting ability to son, Han Solo (Andy Samberg). Fast-forward to present day, Donny with a beer never too far from reach, has yet to accept the reality of his past had caught up with him.

After turning 18, Han Solo left his identity and connection to his parent’s past by changing his name to Todd, moving out and losing weight. He then became successful within the corporate world and is about to marry his dream girl played by Leighton Meester. However, that gets compromised when Donny suddenly appears just a few days shy of the wedding. Donny’s obnoxious devotion to his glory days, alcohol and babes, seems to only worsen Todd’s attempt to paint a pristine picture of himself to his future in-laws.

In a twisted attempt to narrate a story of familial reconciliation in typical Sandler slapstick comedy fashion, such redundancy is a bit tasteless and outdated.

That’s My Boy is marketable due to the relevant faces of Andy Samberg, Nick Swardson and novel celebrity appearances such as Vanilla Ice, Ciara and comedienne, Luenell. However, it’s a shame that the comedic ingenuity of these characters weren’t utilized to their fullest extent and instead thwarted by the lackluster humor of the writers.

Whether the writers and producers have managed to move past Happy Gilmore and Waterboy days is perhaps best answered by the film’s overplayed “Waazaaap” moments that appear in one too many scenes. Laughs were generated from the audience, however more forceful than not. It is a good indicator  that the constant play on stereotypes and the sexual-inappropriateness has long gone stale, something for the funnymen to consider in the formulaic make up of future films.

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