More than 200 million people worldwide play casual games through the Internet today. From free-to-play games to $19.95 per game downloaded to $10 monthly subscription, casual games industry received revenues of nearly $6.00 billion on mobile, social networks, desktops and other platforms in 2010.

Casual Connect Seattle 2012
Casual Connect Seattle 2012 Casual Connect Seattle 2012
Casual Connect Seattle 2012

More than 200 million people worldwide play casual games through the Internet today. From free-to-play games to $19.95 per game downloaded to $10 monthly subscription, casual games industry received revenues of nearly $6.00 billion on mobile, social networks, desktops and other platforms in 2010.

As a technology hub and home to numerous innovators in the casual games industry such as Big Fish Games and PopCap Games, Casual Connect Seattle brings publishers and developers from around the world for a 3-day conference at Benaroya Hall for the seventh time from Jul. 24 – 26.

Revealing his vision of the rapidly changing game business, founder and CEO of Big Fish Games Paul Thelen said the trend is about utilizing the growing capacity of cloud computing.

Thelen believes cloud computing will increase the playability of cross-platform games as we are accessing faster and more stable internet connections with our mobile devices.

While causal games are fun and easy to learn and play, the largest demographic of these players are women over 35.

At the live focus group discussion led by King.com U.S. VP Business Development Jong Woo, six female gamers share their insights and habits about playing causal games.

These women said they play different games to pass time, relieve stress, and to compete against oneself. Some of them play for short intervals throughout the day and may add up to 4 hours of playing time per day. Regarding to the future of causal games industry, they want to see more cross-platform innovations and have involvement in the overall development discussion.

“Actually women are quite tech-savvy,” said Kay Workman, one of the panelists. “It’s extremely important to have someone like us willing to work with developers and publishers to make better games.”

As our society might still hold negative perceptions towards video games as being meaningless, casual games like “Doctor Transplant” successfully busts that myth. Jointly developed by the University of Pittsburgh, CORE, and MogiMe, “Doctor Transplant” allows players to learn about organ and tissue donation through the medium of online and mobile gaming, “saving lives one game at a time”.

Principal investigator of the “Doctor Transplant” project Howard Degenholtz, Ph.D. said the game is designed to integrate information about organ donation into the gameplay.

“It’s a light game that spreads an important message,” said Degenholtz, who is also an associate professor of health policy and management at the University Of Pittsburgh Graduate School Of Public Health.

“Doctor Transplant” was supported by a federal grant and will be releasing in fourth quarter 2012. The developing team hopes the game is easy enough for people to learn more about organ transplant and take action in saving lives.

As game developers and publishers seek to go beyond what games are about today and challenge themselves to create something more technological innovative and meaningful to the society, the future of causal gaming is bright.

http://seattle.casualconnect.org/

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