After the two-week grand sporting event, the London Olympics officially closed on August 12, 2012. Unlike the previous endings where Western countries predominantly took away most of the medals, Asian countries scored an impressive number of medals. It’s worth mentioning that South Korea surprisingly stood out in several races.

After the two-week grand sporting event, the London Olympics officially closed on August 12, 2012. Unlike the previous endings where Western countries predominantly took away most of the medals, Asian countries scored an impressive number of medals. It’s worth mentioning that South Korea surprisingly stood out in several races.

People are not surprised that China and Japan have appeared as outstanding medal-winners. For example, China won 38 gold medals during this Olympic, second only to the United States’ performance.

In terms of the gold medals, South Korea collected three metals in archery and shooting, two in fetching and judo, and one in gymnastics-artistic, taekwondo, and wresting, which leaves 13 at total.

Compared with its previous performance, South Korea once again broke its own record and astonished the Olympics’ audience.  

Notably, South Korean athletes could not achieve such goal without enriched assistance and resources. The government and industry sponsorship both serve a pivotal driving force.

For example, the shooting team that sponsored by Hyundai automobile company has collected three gold medals and one bronze medal. The swimming team sponsored by SK telecom collected two silver medals.

Not only does the government encourage the cultivation of good players, but also various industries financially and spiritually subsidize the development of sports. The public also supports the training and the policy.

Seemingly, the Olympics are not just sports events to South Korean people. They represent a chance to advertise their national strength and economic power.

Rather than taking it as showing off, South Korean people would tell you they deserve the pride–something other Asian countries should learn from them.

To complete in one event, the whole country focuses its resources to assist the executors. After the completion, the country shares the victory with its people.

In reality, sports may not be taken as importantly as economics or other policies. However, the efforts and those medals will definitely bring in more political and economic growth opportunities for South Korea among the world.


Emily Hsu holds a Master’s Degree in Political Science from University of California, Santa Barbara. She is interested in interaction between nations, organizations, and people within the political arena.

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