With the introduction of “moral and national education” classes, the school year in Hong Kong has started with hunger strikes and mass protests this September. To protect future generations from the Chinese Communist Party’s “brainwashing education”, protestors are determined to stand on their grounds until the Hong Kong government takes action to drop such curriculum.

With the introduction of “moral and national education” classes, the school year in Hong Kong has started with hunger strikes and mass protests this September. To protect future generations from the Chinese Communist Party’s “brainwashing education”, protestors are determined to stand on their grounds until the Hong Kong government takes action to drop such curriculum.

Hunger strikers have been joining in relays and organizers said the fast would continue indefinitely. More than 40, 000 people dressed in black chanted outside the city’s legislative council offices on Sept. 2 and the universities are planning on a boycott of classes next week.

Since the strikes and protests broke out, the international media have been keeping up with the latest updates. Many people outside of Hong Kong have made comments. Some cheered for the city’s determination. Yet, many thought the city was overrating to such patriotic education, as it was fairly common in many countries.

It would have been acceptable or even appropriate to many people in Hong Kong if the government was only teaching kids to sing the Chinese national anthem, be respectful to the Chinese flag, and the 3000 years of Chinese history.

However, anyone who has read the content of such “patriotic classes” would know that calling it “brainwashing” was simply accurate. In the drafted syllabus, it states that the goal of this new curriculum is to “make children of the future generations understand that the Chinese Communist Party is liberal and selfless, whereas countries like the United States with multiple political parties are doom to social downfalls.”

Such education is making patriotism equivalent to the support for the political party in power. In other words, in order to show their love for China, people in Hong Kong must first worship the Communist Party.

Fifteen years since the Anglo-Chinese turnover, the communist shit has finally hit the fan in Hong Kong. While the city’s government is obviously pro-China, the determination of these hunger strikers and protestors represent the awakening of the citizens.

Famous for being politically indifferent, people in Hong Kong are finally joining forces to fight for what they view as right. Even if their history textbooks may be biased in the coming years, at least the collective memories of fighting against the communism will be a red light to guide their offspring from now on.


Jocelyn Chui graduated from the University of Washington with a degree in journalism. Her passion in reporting lies on finding community stories that may have been overlooked by the crowd.

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