Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Review – Available Now

Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Box Art(http://www.startrekgame.com)  Rated T for Teen by ESRB.  Star Trek, the game, follows the movie-verse set up in JJ Abrams’ latest Star Trek film. It follows a separate story that takes place after the 1st movie, but before the second–a side story of sorts, if you will. The game follows Spock and Kirk aboard the Enterprise, and allows players to take control of one or the other of these leading male characters, based on the gamer’s preferred style of play. Spock and Kirk are set for a showdown with the Gorn, evil space lizards that steal an experimental weapon and intend to use it to open rifts in the universe. If that story alone doesn’t get you worried about how bad this Star Trek game is, then you may want to keep reading, because it gets much worse.

Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Box ArtStar Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Logo(http://www.startrekgame.com)  Rated T for Teen by ESRB.  Star Trek, the game, follows the movie-verse set up in JJ Abrams’ latest Star Trek film. It follows a separate story that takes place after the 1st movie, but before the second–a side story of sorts, if you will. The game follows Spock and Kirk aboard the Enterprise, and allows players to take control of one or the other of these leading male characters, based on the gamer’s preferred style of play. Spock and Kirk are set for a showdown with the Gorn, evil space lizards that steal an experimental weapon and intend to use it to open rifts in the universe. If that story alone doesn’t get you worried about how bad this Star Trek game is, then you may want to keep reading, because it gets much worse.



Presentation:
The visuals in Star Trek didn’t immediately blow me across a galaxy, and they never really impressed me much at all whilst playing the game. The styling of the visuals means well:  the Enterprise’s interior looks similar to the film, and Kirk and crew look spot-on with the film’s visuals of them. Even though you’ll only get to play as Kirk or Spock, you will get to interact with the rest of the crew throughout missions and intermissions aboard the Enterprise. The main appeal of Star Trek is to those who are looking for a co-op experience, since the entire campaign is built around team work, including the standard “I can’t proceed any further until my partner gets over here and helps me open the door” scenario. Even as a co-op experience you shouldn’t expect much, since this game essentially becomes a shooting gallery with a poor plot and lackluster visual effects.

Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Screenshots   Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Screenshots   Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Screenshots

Graphics:
The developers’ styling of many of the weapons, characters, and environments in the Star Trek game really mean well, but just don’t get what they deserve due to some rather raw qualities that the graphics display. They simply look unfinished–as if they needed more time in development. Although the voice acting is quite good, the facial expressions in Star Trek are nearly emotionless. You’ll see the characters’ lips and eyes move, but that’s about it. Even Spock’s and Kirk’s facial expressions are lacking, and they’re the two main characters. What really surprised me, however, was the over-abundance of “lens flare” in this game, just like in the actual movies themselves. Althoug this technique does give the game some visual continuity with the movie, it still just gets annoying at times. The characters and environments themselves are very stiff looking, as well. For example, when some walls were exploding around me, the explosions looked very cheap and comic-like. I watched as the wall sort of just morphed into a mess, with no no damage process; it just went from being perfect to being destroyed. As for the characters, enemies will go from a running animation to an awkward sudden stop and then begin attacking you. To put it shortly, the game lacks transitional animations at times, which is a bit of a letdown. However, the camera work is great, especially for being a third person shooter, and allows the player to take complete control of it with the right stick. I never found the camera stuck in any awkward places, either, as might have been expected given the other visual deficiencies.

Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Screenshots   Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Screenshots   Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Screenshots

Sounds:
I was very impressed to hear that majority of the voice actors in the Star Trek game were the original actors in the film. This rarely happens for video game movies, probably due to the high cost associated with it. Regardless, the voice acting quality in Star Trek is stellar – the one epic thing about this game. The voices really help to immerse you into the Star Trek atmosphere, since these are the same ones that you’ve heard in the movie. To complement these great voice actors, there is some equally great musical score composition. The score in Star Trek is, again, very reminiscent of the movies, and helps to set the tone of the game. Additionally, I was also pleased with the noises that emanated from the phasers and other alien weapons in the game, which all sounded very “spacey” and fun.

Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Screenshots   Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Screenshots   Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Screenshots

Gameplay:
It wasn’t just the graphics that felt unfinished in Star Trek–the gameplay itself also felt substantially unfinished. To start, I encountered a bag full of sloppy glitches, such as not being able to stun an enemy, weapon switching not working, and Kirk’s hand phasing in and out of objects when he interacted with them. I think one of my favorite glitches was when I was sneaking up on an enemy, pressed the stealth kill button, and it just made the enemy move towards me so I could kill him. It was funny and sad at the same time. Unfortunately, Star Trek does nothing to make itself stand out from other third person cooperative shooters. It’s simply more of same: you run into cover, shoot at enemies with some variety of weapons, and progress to the next area. While there are some “mini games” included, such as using team work to climb through areas or hack through security terminals, these side events aren’t very fun, and just made me want to get back to the endless, boring shooting. And boring it is. The actual shooting in Star Trek is very unrewarding, especially when you only get points to spend on upgrades by stunning the enemies, and then forcing them into submission. It also doesn’t help that enemies drop like flies in Star Trek, except for a few of the tougher ones. There’s not much challenge from the Gorn, nor is there much variety–they basically just go into cover and start shooting. There’s also no competitive multiplayer offered in Star Trek, but you can play missions cooperatively online with friends or random people, which I highly recommend since the AI has a nasty habit of being rampantly killed off.

Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Screenshots   Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Screenshots   Star Trek (PC, Xbox 360, PS3) Screenshots

Conclusion:
Star Trek doesn’t have anything to offer besides the campaign that you can play with friends online, or on the couch. At that, it’s not even a very stellar game; it’s essentially just a shooting gallery with a weak story, bland environments, sub-standard graphics and a bunch of annoying glitches—but with some superb voice acting. Star Trek tries to immerse you in the movie-verse, but fails on almost every level. I can only recommend this game to those who can get it for a very cheap price and have played every other couch co-op game out there. While it does succeed in bringing in some excellent voice acting to the Enterprise, that doesn’t make up for the boring and buggy experience of the game itself.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here