Remember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Box Art(http://www.remembermegame.com/)  Rated M for Mature by ESRB.  The year is 208r, and the setting is in a futuristic Paris called Neo-Paris. Like present-day Paris, this city of the future has both a vast, wealthy population, but also many slums and prisons, as well, which are ripe for an uprising. The majority of the residents of Neo-Paris have been given a unique tool—a device called the Sensen, which has been developed by a company called Memorise. The Sensen enables most of the population to share their memories with others, upload them to the net, or remove bad memories. In other words, memories have become little more than digital files, similar to how music is now mostly stored on an MP3 file. Since most of the citizens of Neo-Paris have Sensen installed, the dark side is that this gives Memorise immense power over them, effectively turning Neo-Paris into a surveillance state, with Sensen secretly controlling their memories. However, there are a few who can see that there is a very real threat with the corporation keeping control of everyone’s memories, and organize to take the Memorise corporation down. These heroes of the game are called The Errorists, and, although you may not realize it from the start, you’re the best Errorist out there—a girl named Nilin.

Remember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Box ArtRemember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Logo(http://www.remembermegame.com/)  Rated M for Mature by ESRB.  The year is 208r, and the setting is in a futuristic Paris called Neo-Paris. Like present-day Paris, this city of the future has both a vast, wealthy population, but also many slums and prisons, as well, which are ripe for an uprising. The majority of the residents of Neo-Paris have been given a unique tool—a device called the Sensen, which has been developed by a company called Memorise. The Sensen enables most of the population to share their memories with others, upload them to the net, or remove bad memories. In other words, memories have become little more than digital files, similar to how music is now mostly stored on an MP3 file. Since most of the citizens of Neo-Paris have Sensen installed, the dark side is that this gives Memorise immense power over them, effectively turning Neo-Paris into a surveillance state, with Sensen secretly controlling their memories. However, there are a few who can see that there is a very real threat with the corporation keeping control of everyone’s memories, and organize to take the Memorise corporation down. These heroes of the game are called The Errorists, and, although you may not realize it from the start, you’re the best Errorist out there—a girl named Nilin.



Presentation:
What I was most excited for in Remember Me was the promise of an original story line, set in a unique universe, and this game totally delivered on that front. Remember Me’s strongest point is showing off that a well-written script–coupled with a thoughtfully conceptualized environment–can make for a great gaming experience, even if the gameplay itself is nothing too extraordinary. The storyline in Remember Me follows Nilin, whom awakens in a Memorise Corporation prison known as Bastille Fortress. In the fortress, criminals and others are taken in to have their memories completely wiped, because they are seen as a threat to society. However, just before Nilin’s memory is to be erased, the leader of the Errorists, called Edge, gets in contact with you, and helps you to escape. From there, Edge will communicate with you from a remote location throughout the game, and give you direct orders on how to help get your own memory back. Edge also works to open the eyes of Neo-Paris’ wealthy, and spread the word that there is a serious problem with the Memorise Corp being in complete control.  Although Nilin doesn’t always agree with Edge’s requests, she still carries them out because she wants her memories back, and wants to remember who she was. It’s a very interesting sub plot within the story, and the overall plot is very compelling and engaging, as well. You’ll also meet some fairly memorable characters along the way, such as Tommy, KidXmas, and Johnny Greenteeth (as if the names weren’t descriptive enough already). The scripting and flow of the story is well executed, as you’ll see the larger effects of both your actions–and Edges—from news screen TVs and also in the world of Neo Paris itself. One creepy aspect of the game that is quite intriguing are the journeys you will take into the slums, which are  on the edges and underneath Neo –Paris.  The slums are inhabited by the Leapers, who are memory-addicted humans whose bodies have become mutated from the over-use of the Sensen technology.

Remember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Screenshots   Remember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Screenshots   Remember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Screenshots

Graphics:
Remember Me’s visuals are very well finished and polished. While it can’t do full 1080p, my PS3 review copy looked and performed quite nicely at the maximum resolution of 720p. While its vision of the future borrows from other games, it gives things enough of a twist to fell fresh. Although the city of Neo-Paris is beautifully crafted, the downside is that you are never given the chance to to explore it on a large scale; essentially, you only get to run through corridors, and never get to experience the city as a whole. Remember Me channels Nilin down a very confined path, with just a few side areas to “explore”, but no interactions with people or objects along the way. Sometimes, other residents will say things to Nilin, but nothing of note that can’t be brushed aside. Although I kept hoping for more dynamic conversations to gain some insights about the culture and world of Neo Paris, it never came. Instead, this all gets pushed into hidden data entries about history and technology in Neo Paris for the player to read if they wish to learn more about the backstory. But when it comes to the characters, you won’t be disappointed.  You can clearly read their facial expressions and emotions just by looking at them, which I really appreciate in games. The character controls work well, too. Since Nilin has a Sensen in her, the Sensen will actually display which ledges you should jump onto, or which direction you should be heading, which I thought was a nice touch for those who may get confused or unsure about the game’s layout.

Remember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Screenshots   Remember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Screenshots   Remember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Screenshots

Sounds:
 Remember Me features a futuristic and electronic heavy soundtrack, with many “glitch” sounds to it. To my ear, the soundtrack fit the atmosphere, and helped put my mind into a futuristic setting.  At times I felt like the soundtrack was trying a bit too hard to stretch beyond today’s music, but the fact that the developers tried to provide much more unique soundtrack, as compared to most games, was appreciated. Moreover, I was just happy that it wasn’t full of nonsensical dubstep. One sound effect I really enjoyed was a noise that indicated that when you were hitting the combo buttons in the correct succession, and then a bigger noise when you finished the combo. And, every time you land a punch or a kick, you’ll hear a satisfying thud on contact. However, when Nilin gets hit, you’ll hear her scream in pain, and the screen will get all glitch. On the subject of Nilin, her voice acting is done very well. She’s got a great accent, and her emotions are conveyed clearly through her voice. At the start of each level you’ll hear Nilin give some commentary about what she thinks of the current situation.  These are the parts where her emotions really shine, and get the player thinking deeply in step with her strides. The other main characters you’ll run into have solid voice acting as well, and I’m relieved to say that nobody’s performance is bad, or even average. They are all north of that line.

Remember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Screenshots   Remember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Screenshots   Remember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Screenshots

Gameplay:
Remember Me’s gameplay style is best described as being a blend of combo-based fighting mechanics, paired with the platforming of an adventure game. As a bonus, Remember Me also offers a unique “make your own combo” system, where you can assign buttons from different “categories” to create unique combos set for your own, preferred type of playstyle. For example, you can opt to add in a power square button, then a healing triangle button, and a cool-down square button. With this sample combo, you would land a powerful attack, then a less powerful attack that would heal Nilin, and finally a slightly powerful attack that would reduce the cool-down to use Nilins special abilities. Nilin unlocks more combo buttons for use when she levels up by earning experience in combat, and more experience by using special takedowns on enemies. Nilin will also gain access to abilities as she progresses through the game; one lets her unleash a relentless fury of attacks, while another will stun all enemies in the surrounding area. There’s a wide range of abilities for the player to use, but you’ll have to play through the story to unlock them all. The combo system is fun, and thankfully allows players to customize combos that are easy for them to remember. The combat will get tricky as you progress through the game, because the game will toss different enemies at Nilin that force the player to use different tactics to take them down. I appreciate that the game doesn’t toss everything at you at once, but instead introduces new enemies and gameplay elements as you progress. One feature that I thought was cool–but simultaneously scary–is the hacking glove Nilin has, which allows her to alter the memories of her target, to something of her choosing. Doing this will play out like a mini game, but the result is almost frightening, and Nillin herself comments it’s like “playing God”. This unique element of the game points back to the main appeal of Remember Me: its well-crafted and well-scripted story. It’s fascinating to be presented with such a unique and innovative sci-fi story, as well as to be put into the hands of a rebel who doesn’t quite believe everything she’s doing is right. Adding these “thoughts” to the game really gives more emotion to it, and lets the player understand how Nilin feels.

Remember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Screenshots   Remember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Screenshots   Remember Me (PS3, Xbox 360, PC) Screenshots

Innovation:
Remember Me just goes to show that an original story, plot, setting, and gameplay mechanics can make a game all the better. Even though Remember Me is not a perfect game, it still shines as a totally original, interesting, and immersive experience for gamers. It presents a solid and interesting story for the medium that is video gaming. Another unique and noticeable aspect of Remember Me is its art and scenery. You’ll often find yourself just looking around at the environment and the graffiti art, as well as jut how definitively the environment is crafted overall.

Conclusion:
Although Remember Me is strictly a single player game, it does offer a great sci-fi story to gamers, as well as some beautiful set pieces to play around in. Remember Me’s unique gameplay mechanics are only fun, but intuitive as well. This goes to show that original stories can be nicely augmented by including original gameplay mechanics. I enjoyed my time with Remember Me, and was thoroughly reminded while playing it how important a well-crafted story can be to a game’s overall quality. I’d recommend Remember Me to any sci-fi fans, or to gamers who really enjoy strong story that’s a bit of a departure from the norm out there. I don’t think Remember Me will satisfy every gamer. It’s definitely a game worth trying if you are looking for an sci-fi adventure out of the ordinary.

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