The Bling RingIf there is ever a contemporary-day defining film that captures the forced awkwardness of bored teens with too much, yet feel too little, Sofia Coppola’s, The Bling Ring, would be it. It is a testimonial to the social-media enthused generation whose cravings for attention are only further exaggerated by the constant exposure of Hollywood life added with the technologically advanced world of Internet searches and smart phones. Yet, while the message is meant to be a reflection of the material-many and unfulfilled-masses, the overall immaturity level may be a bit too painful to bear.

The Bling RingIf there is ever a contemporary-day defining film that captures the forced awkwardness of bored teens with too much, yet feel too little, Sofia Coppola’s, The Bling Ring, would be it. It is a testimonial to the social-media enthused generation whose cravings for attention are only further exaggerated by the constant exposure of Hollywood life added with the technologically advanced world of Internet searches and smart phones. Yet, while the message is meant to be a reflection of the material-many and unfulfilled-masses, the overall immaturity level may be a bit too painful to bear.  

Influenced by the 2010 Vanity Fair article, “The Suspects Wore Louboutins,” written by Nancy Jo Sales, Coppola’s film similarly chronicles the lives of four teens who would later become suspects of Los Angeles’s infamous burglary ring that targets Hollywood’s rich and famous. Victims are well known celebrities, which includes Paris Hilton, Orlando Bloom and Rachel Bilson.

It starts out mildly enough with one girl’s kleptomaniac-tendency (Katie Chang) to nab wallets from unlocked cars and quickly escalates into frequent break-ins into the homes of celebrities to engorge on brand name goods.

The Bling Ring is an hour and a half compilation of melodramatic scenes mixed with slow motion cinematic effects seemingly meant to mimic the carefree and reckless nature of teens wanting materialistic goods to fill their empty lives.

Unfortunately, emptiness is just about where this film leaves us.

Rebecca Chang, Emma Watson, Isreal Broussard, and Claire Julien all play teens that want the lives similar to the celebrities surrounding them; and as impressionable teens, that’s understandable enough. However, their deliverance fails to translate in a capturing way.

Rebecca (Chang), the ringleader, whose nonchalant attitude serves to reassure her nervous friends during burglary outings, ends up just being another attractive face with little conviction. While her aesthetic does serve to explain why someone like Marc (Broussard), a new kid with insecurities would bite the bullet and latch onto her every word, that notion quickly becomes stale as her presence remain stagnant and boring throughout the rest of the film. Watson and Julien as supporting actors do manage to add dynamic to the group; however their dialogue is injected with way too many superficial “homie” and “chill” additives that it cancels out any hope for film redemption.

Maybe that’s a bit harsh. If anything, Leslie Mann, who plays Watson’s oblivious and hippy mom does a great job at delivering the humor. Though it’s probably unfair to pit a seasoned comedienne against young actresses meant to play shallow privileged teens.

The Bling Ring echoes a Mean Girls sequel, but lacks the genuine tone typically gained by meaningful humor and convincing dialogue. Instead, the lines are forceful and the message lacks resonance. Perhaps it would have been better to let Frank Ocean’s “Super Rich Kids” play for an extended period of time, instead of just during the credits, to cut the bad screenplay and get to the point.  

Rated R; Running time: 1 hr and 30 minutes

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here