Where do I even begin with White House Down? Is it the perfect blend of Hollywood cynicism and delusional optimism? Why yes, it unfortunately is.

Where do I even begin with White House Down? Is it the perfect blend of Hollywood cynicism and delusional optimism? Why yes, it unfortunately is.

This most-likely-going-to-be-some-kind-of-summer-hit movie is about the American political hierarchy under attack. A seemingly ragtag group of terrorists seizes the White House. Most of the important personnel and civilians escape, but a tour group that contains our hero (played by Channing Tatum,) along with the president, is not so lucky.

While the actors are commendable, the plot was problematic since the beginning. We initially see the terrorists in disguise, in one way or another, planting their bombs and planning their maneuvers. Though we never see how they got in there in the first place. The film was about a civilian protecting the leader of the free world, but these men somehow, someway, infiltrated the front lines of security well enough to cause a diverting explosion and execute their evil plans.

Of course, there’s always someone from the inside, and as the movie goes on, we see who these people are. With every gunshot fired, the villains’ motives are revealed, layer by layer. Each person on the team has his own vendetta, whether it is money, revenge, or just a knack for crumbling the American government down.

But what could have been an honest, emotional, will-driven story is overshadowed by typical bang-bang, shootout, action flick components. The producers know that by inserting a loudmouth Rambo wannabe, a handful of grenades, a few confused politicians, and the biggest threat in the nation’s history, a movie will pretty much pay for itself.

Alongside the plot holes, there is the comedy. Was this movie intended to be a serious, political action film? I cannot speak for its makers, but I am sure that serious is not the end product. Spots of comedic relief come at oddly-timed moments, producing an almost satirical effect. The role of President James Sawyer (played by Jamie Foxx) is undoubtedly how Foxx would be if he himself were the actual president of the United States. His snarky, non-presidential, highly civilian traits make for a humorous distraction. He wears Jordans to run across battle and puts on glasses before using military-grade weapons. Well, of course.

It seems that this movie was never meant to be fully thought out in the first place. It is expected and clunky in every sense. It is mad and mind-boggling, and the “wait what?” feeling that is sure to come by the end of the story will not be a good one. And it is definitely not worth the movie fare.

 

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