City of Bellevue held the Fu Dogs Dedication Ceremony at the City Hall Plaza on Jul. 29, along with the public and distinguished members from its sister city, Hualien, Taiwan, R.O.C.

Photo by Joshua ChinCity of Bellevue held the Fu Dogs Dedication Ceremony at the City Hall Plaza on Jul. 29, along with the public and distinguished members from its sister city, Hualien, Taiwan, R.O.C.

Bellevue mayor, Conrad Lee, unraveled the red cloth veil tied around the statue’s eyes, symbolizing the awakening of the lions.

International Lion Dance and Martial Arts Team kicked off the ceremony with firecrackers and an energetic lion dance.

“What a prosperous event this is, right?” said Mayor Lee. “These pair of lions will surely bring opportunity and prosperity to our city and our region.”

U.S. Congressman, Adam Smith, and Director General, Andy Chin of Taiwan Economic and Culture Office later acknowledged the success of this companionship.

Photo by City of BellevueThe 1.8-ton Chinese Guardian lions, also known as the Fu Dogs, are symbols of fortune and protection. The new pairs of guardians will replace the previous, single “bachelor” dog near the City Hall entrance. According to Lee, the former statue will be treasured, and kept in a safe place until it could be installed upon the completion of the new Asian Garden.

In the past, the city of Hualien had also presented a marble statue of Guan Yin and expressed sympathy after the September 11 terrorist attack.

Mrs. Zhang Mei-Hui, First Lady of Hualien, explained the choice of white marble originated from the Chungyang Range, east of Hualien.

“We chose marble because Hualien marble represents our society, and it’s also the finest in the world,” said Zhang. “We sincerely wish Bellevue prosperity, peace and happiness.”

Lee said Bellevue is a city with 30 percent of Asian American, and one-third of foreign born population. Bellevue continues to reflect a city with an international mindset.

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