Lost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Box Art(http://www.capcom-unity.com/lost_planet‎)  Rated M for Mature by ESRB.  Lost Planet 3 is the prequel to both Lost Planet Extreme Condition and Lost Planet 2, putting players at the helms of a NEVEC new recruit, Jim Peyton. The game begins with Jim as an old man, stuck under a heavy rock, and spending his last moments alive telling his granddaughter why “this problem” is his fault. He then proceeds to recount his whole story about being employed with NEVEC, while being stationed on EDN III. You start off your adventure with Jim heading off to the planet with no idea of what to expect; he is just an archetypal young recruit signing up for a job, and looking for a way to make good money to support his family on a dying Earth. It was this simple approach to the story, along with the change of style, which really got me interested in Lost Planet 3, whereas the previous titles were never really able to grapple me with an interesting storyline. However, many elements from previous lost planet games are still here, such as the enemy types, the Rigs (giant robots), and grappling hook mechanics. One thing’s for certain about Lost Planet 3: it has a totally different feel and style from its previous titles. So, fans of the old, make sure you do your research before purchasing.

Lost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Box ArtLost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Logo(http://www.capcom-unity.com/lost_planet‎)  Rated M for Mature by ESRB.  Lost Planet 3 is the prequel to both Lost Planet Extreme Condition and Lost Planet 2, putting players at the helms of a NEVEC new recruit, Jim Peyton. The game begins with Jim as an old man, stuck under a heavy rock, and spending his last moments alive telling his granddaughter why “this problem” is his fault. He then proceeds to recount his whole story about being employed with NEVEC, while being stationed on EDN III. You start off your adventure with Jim heading off to the planet with no idea of what to expect; he is just an archetypal young recruit signing up for a job, and looking for a way to make good money to support his family on a dying Earth. It was this simple approach to the story, along with the change of style, which really got me interested in Lost Planet 3, whereas the previous titles were never really able to grapple me with an interesting storyline. However, many elements from previous lost planet games are still here, such as the enemy types, the Rigs (giant robots), and grappling hook mechanics. One thing’s for certain about Lost Planet 3: it has a totally different feel and style from its previous titles. So, fans of the old, make sure you do your research before purchasing.



Presentation:
The style overhaul that Lost Planet 3 received is most impressive, and it definitely feels more “western” than its previous entries. In fact, if you have a déjà vu moment, you might recall that Capcom has recently done this before, with their new entry in the Devil May Cry series that got a complete makeover to try and appeal more to a western audience. I really do like this new, western look for Lost Planet. It seems much more realistic, and feels more mature and advanced than its predecessors. Your character, Jim Peyton, is a very relatable and understandable character. His approach into the corporation is one that we can all relate to. He signed up for a job that looked promising, and to make a little cash. Who wouldn’t? The planet of EDN III is a frozen wasteland, but home to the precious T-Eng, short for Thermal Energy, and the NEVEC Corp wants to farm this energy source in the hope that it can help save planet Earth. Jim can do various tasks around the base to help out friends, or just take direct orders from the Boss. I enjoyed the inclusion of optional side quests, because it made the base feel much more alive and interesting, instead of just a useless hub to go and purchase new weapons and upgrades at. You can also pilot your Rig around the many locations of EDN 3 if you want to go out and kill some Akrids for some extra T Eng to upgrade equipment with. This Lost Planet feels much better than the previous entries, and while old fans of the series may not like its new look, I think that many gamers will adapt.

Lost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Screenshots   Lost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Screenshots   Lost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Screenshots

Graphics:
As stated earlier, Lost Planet 3 did get a total overhaul for visuals and style, so the game does look much different than the previous entries. While you still are on a frozen planet, the visuals are of a much higher quality than the previous games, and the movements of the characters seem much more fluid and realistic, and less arcade-like. For example, when I found myself in an ice cave, the ice was very shimmery and smooth looking, and even featured ribbings similar to real ice structures. The facial expressions of the characters in this game are quite expressive, and the in-game cutscenes actually looked incredibly smooth. The gameplay itself is refined as well, and I was impressed by how smooth it ran on PS3, while maintaining such crisp graphics. The lighting of the planet itself is also spectacularly beautiful, but is still able to seem natural. Your Rig is a great example of how well the lighting effects are executed in this game. Sometimes you have to walk a far distance from your RIG, but thanks to its massive size and many lights, it’s easy to spot amidst the blizzards and chaos from enemy Akrids. The graphics, to me at least, were better than Lost Planet 2’s graphics, and also aided in making the world and story much more believable.

Lost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Screenshots   Lost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Screenshots   Lost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Screenshots

Sounds:
Thankfully, your wife was sweet and courteous enough to send you a musical playlist so you have some tunes to listen to in your Rig while you’re working or exploring the arctic planes and caverns of EDN 3. The music that’s playable in your rig mostly ranges from alternative rock to country-flavored songs, which fits Jim Peyton’s personality perfectly. You also have the option to turn the music off altogether, and listen to the sweet mechanical groans and movements of your Rig, which can be pretty peaceful at times. Besides the music and the sound effects of the rig, the voice acting done within Lost Planet 3 is very well executed. Nobody really sounds bland or unmotivated. Even the NPCs have great characters and personalities that were wonderfully conveyed through their voice actor’s work. I personally enjoyed the Gun Shop merchant’s kind words and nick names for me; they gave the game a very personal feel.

Lost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Screenshots   Lost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Screenshots   Lost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Screenshots

Gameplay:
With Lost Planet 3’s campaign, you’ll embark on Jim’s story, beginning with his time spent with the NEVEC corporation. The NEVEC base acts as a central hub for acquiring missions and purchasing weapon upgrades, and also essentially serves as the garage for your Rig. Lost Planet 3 is still a run and gun third person shooter like its predecessors, and will have you fighting many Akrids as the previous titles did. Weak spots on the Akrid still glow orange, and the basic gameplay formula hasn’t changed much, with the exception of some cover based shooting mechanics. One game mechanic change has added in a bit of a horror element, though. When you stray too far from your RIG, you lose your mini map and weapons information, which then triggers a cool challenge element to come into the game. You’re out alone on the planet, without any of your tech to show you where enemies are coming from, so you have to rely on your instincts. I appreciated this little touch because it gave some variety with the gameplay. When you get back to your Rig you feel much safer, because it can defeat enemies with ease, and also houses lots of ammo for your hand held weapons. The Rig doesn’t actually carry any weapons itself, but does have a giant drill arm, as well as a regular arm for punching and grabbing, which are great melee weapons. That being said, while bashing Akrids is fun, it’s only fun for so long. The game does introduce more enemy types along the way, but Lost Planet 3’s gameplay starts to feel pretty stale, pretty quickly. The story progression can go at a steady pace if you just focus on the primary missions, or it can move at a slower pace if you pick up optional missions. The story itself is pretty interesting, but the gameplay just needs more variety in it to really be fun, which is a bit of a shame. With just a notch more variety, this game could have delivered a lot more enjoyment.

Lost Planet 3 also features many competitive multiplayer online modes. One competitive mode is a match that pits two teams of 3 in a survival mode against waves and waves of Akrid, with the difficulty of the enemies increasing with each surpassing wave. As a finale, they must win a contest for a credit reward zone in a final elimination round. It plays like most typical survival modes in games, but has you not only fighting enemy Akrids, but enemy players, as well. There are also three 5 v 5 modes: team deathmatch, extraction (where players have to set up T-Eng extractors and defend them), and scenario, which has teams taking turns between offensively and defensively completing tasks. There are tons of unlockables for your mutliplayer character as well, such as new weapons, deployables and special abilities–all accessible from the Progression Sphere. As you complete matches and earn credits, you can purchase cells on the sphere that contain certain upgrades, and you won’t know what other upgrades there are until you purchase a cell bordering another available cell. Overall, the multiplayer modes are all fairly fun, and give the player something else to keep entertained after the campaign has been completed.

Lost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Screenshots   Lost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Screenshots   Lost Planet 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) Screenshots

Conclusion:
Lost Planet 3’s campaign takes around 12 – 15 hours to complete, and it’s a very interesting story all the way through. I enjoyed the relatable main character, Jim Peyton, and the charismatic crew of the NEVAC EDN III station. Jim’s story with the NEVAC Corporation is an interesting one as well, which explains the corporation’s purpose and why Jim and the rest of the crew stay there on this planet. The style overhaul of Lost Planet 3 looks fantastic, which only further emphasizes the disappointment that the gameplay itself leaves a little to be desired. Lost Planet’s shooting mechanics are all sufficient, but I do wish the developers had made it a bit more fun and gave you more weapons to defeat the Akrid with, since they admittedly feel repetitive and bland after a while. Lost Planet 3 is a solid third person shooter with an interesting story, if hampered with somewhat repetitive gameplay mechanics and tactics. I would recommend it to anyone looking for a fresh third person shooter with a decent story, but also might recommend to them to wait for the game to lower in price, since the gameplay does start to feel bland after a few hours in the campaign, and even online at some points.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here