Carrie (2013)(http://www.carrie-movie.com/site/Carrie White, a shy, social outcast whose soul is tormented and suppressed by her environment, splashes blood onto the screen once more. Adapting from Stephen King’s novel, and a reimagining of the 1976 classic, Kimberly Peirce (director of “Boys Don’t Cry”), not has to honor the original source of material, but also has to summon attraction and relevance in the modern era. In other words, Peirce has some large shoes to fill, and her pressure is transparent throughout the film. 

Carrie (2013)(http://www.carrie-movie.com/site/Carrie White, a shy, social outcast whose soul is tormented and suppressed by her environment, splashes blood onto the screen once more.

Adapting from Stephen King’s novel, and a reimagining of the 1976 classic, Kimberly Peirce (director of “Boys Don’t Cry”), not has to honor the original source of material, but also has to summon attraction and relevance in the modern era. In other words, Peirce has some large shoes to fill, and her pressure is transparent throughout the film.

Carrie (played by the talented Chloe Grace Moretz), a girl raised by her mentally unstable mother (Julianne Moore), goes through her adolescent struggles without a fatherly figure or a mother’s nurtures. She is constantly locked up in a closet by her religious mother and forced to repent for her sins. The trouble worsens as she indirectly clashes with her merciless classmate, who vows to bring down Carrie. Along with loneliness, confusion, and dashed hope, Carrie initiates her newfound telekinesis power that ultimately results in a bloodbath.

Peirce tries hard to renovate her source of material. She utilizes contemporary sport references and digital innovations that are lacking in King’s novel. Back in 1974, there was no YouTube to upload vicious pranks. Peirce also adapts new music (particularly a beautiful song by The Civil Wars) to fit the modernized version. Other than that, Peirce misses opportunities to revolutionize. Even with the attempt to renew, Peirce’s version suffers from an identity crisis.

The movie is “genreless”. It is humorous at times, horror at the next moment, and suddenly dramatic. A horror movie that successfully incorporates comedic elements is a stroke of genius. Yet when a mismatch of genres encounters pacing issues, this flaw induces unintentional laughter and strips away the effectiveness of a scene. The protagonist may be suffering, but the audience’s mindsets are still lingering in the previous comedic scene so their mentalities are off-synch on an emotional level.

Although the negatives outweigh the positives in this film, there are still laudable elements embedded. Both Moretz and Moore are capable actresses. Moretz adequately brings the fragility and insecurity that are so prevalent in the adolescent area. Moore demonstrates the result of a fanatic devotion when someone takes a belief too far.

This movie also induces hopeful messages. With jeers and setbacks, Carrie receives support from her environment —mainly from Tommy, Sue, and a gym teacher. Together they intend to create a better high school experience for Carrie out of sympathy. Interestingly, when the film focuses on the themes of hope and friendship, the film excels. When the camera delves in and explores the horror genre, the movie falls short. King did not write “Carrie” to promulgate his mastery in the horror field. Peirce concentrates too hard on the horror realm when there is not too much horror elements to work with in the first place.

In the end, “Carrie” is an adequate, twisted adolescent story with fair attempts to revitalize a faint heartbeat.

Running time: 92 minutes; Rated R



LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here